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    Space station orientation for maximum voltage difference

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    Imagine a space station module shaped like a cylinder 30m long and 5m in diameter orbiting close to the earth above the earth's equater. What would be the maximum potential difference that could develop between the ends of the module. (I know that potential difference=EL but how do I find E? It is also equal to VB/C or v*magnetic field/speed of light).

    How would the module have to be oriented to get the maximum voltage difference? Could this voltage difference be used to supply the station with electric current, why or why not?

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    https://brainmass.com/physics/orbits/space-station-orientation-maximum-voltage-difference-11159

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    You can find it by putting value of B (earth's magnetic field strength and velocity of module. There will be maximum ...

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    The expert examines space station orientation for maximum voltage differences. In a few sentences the problem is explored and answered.

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