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When scientists are trying to understand a particular set of phenomena, they often make use of, in a scientific sense, a kind of analogy or mental image of the phenomena in terms of something we are familiar with called:
(a) model
(b) theory
(c) law
(d) principle

Usually a model is relatively simple and provides a structural similarity to the phenomena being studied, whereas a more broader, more detailed, and can give quantitatively testable predictions, often with great precision is called:
(a) model
(b) theory
(c) law
(d) principle

The number of reliably known digits in a number is called:
(a) insignificant figures (b) whole numbers
( c) integers
(d) significant figures

The first real international standard established as the standard of length was:
(a) meter (b) foot
(c) centimeter
(d) yard

The commonly accepted set of units today is the Systeme International (SI) in which the standard units of length, mass, and time are:
(a) meter, gram and second
(b) meter, kilogram and minute
(c) meter, kilogram and second
(d) foot, pound, and second

Objects that move without rotating are called:
( a) transverse motion
(b) translational motion
(c) kinetic motion
(d) potential motion

Displacement is a quantity that has both magnitude an direction called:
(a) axes
(b) frame of reference
(c) vectors
(d) distance

The distance traveled along its path divided by the time it takes to travel this distance is:
(a) average speed
(b) displacement
(c) instantaneous velocity
(d) terminal velocity

The average velocity over an infinitesimally short time interval is:
(a) average speed
(b) velocity
(c) instantaneous velocity
(d) terminal velocity

The change in velocity divided by the time taken to make this change is:
(a) instant acceleration
(b) average acceleration
(c) average speed
(d) velocity

When the acceleration is or close enough that we can assume it is constant, we call this:
(a) instant acceleration
(b) uniformly acceleration motion
(c) average acceleration
(d) instantaneous velocity

The "father of modem science" is:
(a) Galileo
(b) Newton
(c) Ramazanni
(d) Archimedes

At a given location on the Earth and in the absence of air resistance, all objects fall with the same constant acceleration due to:
(a) motion
(b) mass
(c) density
(d) gravity

The change in the dependent variable (x) divided by the independent variable (y) in a graphical analysis is called:
(a) height
(b) width
(c) slope
(d) area

Any measurement of position, distance, or speed must be made with respect to a:
(a) time
(b) frame of reference
(c) variable
(d) unit

The description of how objects move is:
(a) kinematics
(b) translational motion
(c) dynamics
(d) velocity

Mechanics that deals with force and why objects move as they do is:
(a) kinematics
(b) translational motion
(c) dynamics
(d) speed

The standard unit of time is the:
(a) minute
(b) hour
(c) day
(d) second

A certain concise but general statement about how nature behaves is called:
(a) theory
(b) principle
(c) law
(d) model

The most basic of the sciences is:
(a) chemistry
(b) geology
(c) biology
(d) physics

A quantity such as velocity, which has direction as well as magnitude, is:
(a) vector
(b) scalar
(c) resultant
(d) velocity

Many quantities such as mass, time, and temperature, have no direction associated with them. They are specified completely by giving a number and unit called:
(a) vectors
(b) scalars
(c) resultants
(d) speed

Motion taking place in two dimensions is:
(a) projectile motion
(b) linear motion
(c) lateral motion
(d) kinetic motion

The length of the resultant can be measured with a ruler and compared to scale.
Angles can be measured with a protractor. This method is known as the:
(a) sum of squares
(b) tip-to-tail
(c) tail-to-tip
(d) tip-to-tip

A vector V that lies in a particular plane can be expressed as the some of two other vectors usually chosen to be along two perpendicular directions is called:
(a) vectors
(b) scalars
(c) resultants
(d) components

Any kind of a push or a pull on an object is:
(a) force
(b) vector
(c) scalar
(d) distance

Every body continues in its state of rest or of uniform speed in a straight line unless acted upon by a nonzero net force is:
(a) Newton's zeroth Law of Motion
(b) Newton's First Law of Motion
(c) Newton's Second Law of Motion (d) Newton's Third Law of Motion

A measure of the inertia ofa body is:
(a) weight
(b) velocity
( c) distance
(d) mass

The acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and is inversely proportional to its mass. The direction of the acceleration is in the direction of the net force acting on it. This is Newton's:
(a) Zeroth Law of Motion
(b) First Law of Motion
c) Second Law of Motion
(d) Third Law of Motion

In SI units, with the mass in kilograms, the unit of force is called the:
(a) Newton
(b) Galileo
(c) Pound
(d) Erg

Whenever one object exerts a force on a second object, the second exerts an equal and opposite force on the first. This is Newton's:
(a) Zeroth Law of Motion
(b) First Law of Motion
(c) Second Law of Motion
(d) Third Law of Motion

The force of gravity on an object is called its:
(a) mass
(b) weight
(c) volume
(d) area

Normal force means:
(a) parallel
(b) tangent
(c) perpendicular
(d) weight

The vector sum of all forces acting on an object is:
(a) resultant
(b) total
(c) net
(d) difference

When solving problems involving Newton's laws and force, it is very important to draw a diagram showing all the forces acting on each object involved. Such a diagram is called:
(a) free-falling
(b) free-body
( c) free- time
(d) free-space

Sliding friction is usually called:
(a) kinetic
(b) static
(c) potential
(d) net

A force parallel to two surfaces that can arise even when they are not sliding is:
(a) kinetic
(b) static
( c) potential
(d) net

A second way to add two vectors is the:
(a) triangle method
(b) parallelogram method (c) circle method
(d) square method

Newton's first law is often called the law of
(a) inertia
(b) force
(c) displacement
(d) distance

Newton's second law of motion can be written as:
(a) F = rt
(b) F=ma
(c) F = pgh
(d) F=dt

Solution Preview

When scientists are trying to understand a particular set of phenomena, they often make use of, in a scientific sense, a kind of analogy or mental image of the phenomena in terms of something we are familiar with called:
(a) model

Usually a model is relatively simple and provides a structural similarity to the phenomena being studied, whereas a more broader, more detailed, and can give quantitatively testable predictions, often with great precision is called:
(b) theory

The number of reliably known digits in a number is called:
(d) significant figures

The first real international standard established as the standard of length was:
(a) meter

The commonly accepted set of units today is the Systeme International (SI) in which the standard units of length, mass, and time are:
(c) meter, kilogram and second

Objects that move without rotating are called:
(b) translational motion

Displacement is a quantity that has both magnitude an direction called:
(c) vectors

The distance traveled along its path divided by the time it takes to travel this distance is:
(a) average ...

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