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DO MITHOLOGY, RELIGION, PHILOSOPHY AND SCIENCE SAY ESSENTIALY THE SAME BUT IN DIFFERENT LANGUAGES?

SPECIFIC PHILOSOPHICAL THEORIES IN FAVOR OR AGAINST THE CAPTION STATEMENT

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DEFINITIONS

Mythology can be a term used pejoratively by religious and non-religious people both, by defining another person's religious stories and beliefs as mythology. Here myths are treated as fantasies, or "mere" stories. The term myth in sociology, however has a non-pejorative meaning, defined as stories that are important for the group and not necessarily untrue. The study of religions, and the investigation of myths by psychology, not to mention how some myths turn out to have historical verification, has brought about a mixed, almost contradictory use of the term.

Religion is commonly defined as belief concerning the supernatural, scared, or divine often resulting in worship, and possibly including related institutions and organizations.

Science is both a process of gaining knowledge, and the organized body of knowledge gained by this process. The scientific process is the systematic acquisition of new knowledge about a system.

Philosophy is a study of the reality, causes, and principles underlying being and thinking.

COMMON POINT OF REFERENCE

Human beings, nature and ways of looking at the world

THEORIES FOR OR AGAINST THE CAPTION

Early in the 20th century, many scholars, intellectuals, and philosophers looked on the relationship of mythology, religion, philosophy, and science as an evolutionary one in which the more sophisticated ways of looking at the world simply replaced the older ways. Religion itself was often thought to arise from magic. Only science, mathematics, and logic would deserve to continue. Since these scholars thought of magic as a set of naive beliefs about how to manipulate nature, they thought that science ultimately fulfilled this promise by actually manipulating nature in the ways that magic had promised. Especially associated with this evolutionary scheme was James George Frazer, whose classic The Golden Bough [1890, 1900, 1906-1915] was an extended argument and illustration of it.
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