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    When do I need absolute values when simplifying nth roots?

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    This question arises typically when dealing with the principal square root which is the full name of the function involving the radical. An absolute value can arise from a simplification whenever the index is an even integer. Here are two cases, one when the absolute value is simplified out and one when it is required in the final answer.

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    Both cases are clearly detailed with a steps in both a Word and PDF document.

    When do I need absolute values when simplifying nth roots?

    This question arises typically when dealing with the principal square root which is the full name of the function involving the radical √x. Here the radicand, inside the radical, is x and the index is not stated and thus implied to be 2 for square root. An absolute value can arise from a simplification whenever the index is an even integer. Here are two cases, one when the absolute value is simplified out and one when it is required in the final answer.

    Remember that the principal square root function can only access nonnegative values and ...

    Solution Summary

    Cases of an absolute value arising from a simplification of a root whenever the index is an even integer. Both cases, one when the absolute value is simplified out and one when it is required in the final answer, are clearly detailed with a steps in both a Word and PDF document.

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