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Intro to Criminal Justice

1. Many community groups are concerned about the apparent move in some jurisdictions to a type of policing that focuses on " quality of life " issues. Should these groups be concerned? What dangers, if any, are there to civil rights if police departments adopt a strategy addressing quality of life issues?

2. Is it a good use of tax payers' money to increase the number of police "on the streets" (one of the goals of the nineteen ninety four crime bill)? How could the money be spent in other ways to increase policy efficiency or effectiveness?

3. Evaluations consistently show that some of the most popular programs, such as DARE and neighborhood watch, have no impact on crime. why do so many police departments continue to support these programs?

4. Recruitment of women and minorities was meant to overcome inequality and segregation within the police force. In police departments, however, there are gender, racial, and ethnic-based society. Do these societies have the reverse effect of driving groups apart? How can we justify membership in such societies?

5. The mayor and the police commissioner of a major have come under attack for deteriorating police/community relations. Could improved recruitment practices help the situation? How?

6. Many nations, such as Canada and Great Britain, have national police forces that perform many of the duties of state and county police in this country. Should the United States consider something similar? Why or why not?

7. What are the dangers to society, if any, of more and more policing responsibilities shifting to the private sector?

8. Despite repeated demands by investigatory commissions that police officers be better educated, there are some people (even within police organizations) who think more education for police is not always a good idea. Where do you stand on this issue? For example, what is an adequate level education for a new police officer? A bachelorette degree? An associates degree? A high school diploma?

9. What are the best arguments in favor of the view that the criminal justice system is actually a "non system" or anything but a system?

Solution Preview

1. Many community groups are concerned about the apparent move in some jurisdictions to a type of policing that focuses on " quality of life " issues. Should these groups be concerned? What dangers, if any, are there to civil rights if police departments adopt a strategy addressing quality of life issues?

The civil rights that may be in jeopardy of being violated are those of the homeless who are comprised of war veterans, mentally ill individuals, and substance abusers, which typically are traits that describe the person. The overwhelming majority of homeless are war veterans and most are substance abusers who suffer from some form of mental illness. Focusing on "quality of life" means removing any unsightly individuals from the community and if these individuals have no other place to go, they will be simply arrested for being homeless. This can violate the civil and human rights of those in the community who fought for the country but are now harassed and arrested for sleeping in the public because it supposedly reduces the quality of life of those in the community.

2. Is it a good use of tax payers' money to increase the number of police "on the streets" (one of the goals of the nineteen ninety four crime bill)? How could the money be spent in other ways to increase policy efficiency or effectiveness?

Yes, it is a good use of taxpayer's money but only when the department has utilized systems such as COMPSTAT that enable the department to appropriate funds and resources toward definitive areas that have been shown to be criminal hotspots. Simply putting more money toward providing police on the streets is nonsensical unless methods have been put in place to gain data, process this data, and use the data to MAP hotspots with CRIMEMAPPING that is capable of informing police departments of the most pertinent areas that need more police on the street.

3. Evaluations consistently show that some of the most popular programs, such as DARE and neighbor hood watch, have no impact on crime. why do so many police departments continue to support these programs?

This is a simple answer, the "war on drugs", which has been a colossal failure and waste of trillions of dollars as ...

Solution Summary

The dangers, if any, are there to civil rights if police departments adopt a strategy addressing quality of life issues are determined. The expert determines why so many police departments continue to support these programs.

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