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the policy and procedure for collecting fingerprint evidence and firearms and ammunition

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Please explain the policy and procedure for collecting fingerprint evidence and firearms and ammunition. Please provide references.

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Please explain the policy and procedure for collecting fingerprint evidence and firearms and ammunition. Please provide references.

Dactyloscopy is the technique of comparing fingerprints, typically those found at the setting of a crime and those of a suspect. Due to the uniqueness of the fingers' and hands' papillar lines, it is generally considered a reliable method of identifying a person. Croat-Argentine Juan Vucetich perfected dactyloscopy in late 19th and early 20th century. When a person touches something with his fingers, there will usually be a visible or invisible residue left on the touched surface. The residue is patterned as a copy of the person's fingerprint and can be collected for visual study and comparison. Traditionally, finely ground powders of chalk or coal have been used to make the fingerprint clearly visible. The powder adheres to the fingerprint residue but not the surrounding surface. Sometimes the prints are invisible, in which case they are called "latent fingerprints". There are chemical techniques such as cyanoacrylate fuming and ninhydrin spray that can help make them visible. There are three basic fingerprint patterns: Arch, Loop and Whorl. There are more complex classification systems that further break down the pattern to plain arches or tented arches. Loops may be radial or ulnar. Whorls also have smaller classifications. However, the five most commonly used are: whorl, radial loop, ulnar loop, arch and tented arch. A fingerprint is an imprint made by the pattern of ridges on the pad of a human finger. These ridges are known as dermal ridges. Dermal ridges are not unique to humans, however, and some species of primate are also capable of generating fingerprints. Dermal ridges are commonly believed to provide traction for grasping objects. Fingerprints are usually considered to be unique, with no two fingers having the exact same friction ridge characteristics. A person's fingerprint can be used as a biometric method to identify human individuals.
In case of fire arms and ammunition it is important that the investigating officer on the scene identify the following:
Guns:
1. Semi-automatic
2. Revolver
3. Rifle
4. Shotgun
Bullets:
1. Full metal jacket
2. Soft point
3. Hollow point
4. Lead alloy
Cartridge markings:
1. Firing pin
2. Breech block
3. ...

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The policy and procedures for collecting fingerprint evidence and firearms and ammunition are indicated.

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As a detective with a local law enforcement department, you are one of the first to arrive at the scene of a drive-by shooting, which resulted in the death of a teenage male.

I have attach the full assignment. I don't know where to start. Help me please.

Write a paper involving a murder scenario. Aside from the information listed below, the details of the scenario are left to your imagination. The result should be a 1,750- to 2,100-word paper, in APA format, with at least three reliable sources to support your handling of various communication situations.

Here's the Scenario!

Scenario

As a detective with a local law enforcement department, you are one of the first to arrive at the scene of a drive-by shooting, which resulted in the death of a teenage male. The shooting occurred at a corner gas station of a low-income neighborhood. A number of witnesses approach you, including a child who was playing outside; a hearing-impaired, visually shaken man who was pumping gas at the station; and a group of young gang members, upset by their friend's murder.

Before you get out of your car, you pause to think about communication.

? Discuss potential communication barriers that you might encounter and how you might overcome them.

You get out of your car and look around the crime scene.

? Indicate the impact your nonverbal communications may have while interacting with other officers, witnesses, and possible suspects.

You want to interview your witnesses.

? Describe the interviewing process you would follow for each witness.
? How do you go about speaking with the hearing-impaired man, the child, and the gang members?

After gathering all your information, you go back to the police department.

? Discuss the technology used throughout the investigation and in the courtroom.
? What are the ethical issues to consider?

At the office, you begin to write your report.

? Compose a report based on the who, what, when, where, why, and how information available.

After all of the information is reviewed and you have followed up on leads, you have a possible suspect for the murder. When arresting the suspect, he suddenly takes a hostage. Address the following:

? Conflict resolution
? Subsequent interrogation
? Associated legal issues
? Writing a press release

Your suspect is finally charged with murder and pleads not guilty. A trial is set, and you attend it.

Who are the key participants in this trial? Discuss credibility issues.
What role will you play in the trial, if any?

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