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Differentiating juvenile and adult offenders

Legal definitions of juvenile status vary widely in the United States. Taking into account factors that may impact levels of maturity and culpability, propose a chronological age that you believe should differentiate juvenile offenders from adult offenders. Give reasons for proposing your chosen age of majority. Should this age of majority vary depending on the crime committed? Defend your view with examples.

Factors impacting levels of maturity in youths and their significance while dealing with juvenile offenders.

An assessment of the factors affecting maturity in youths by court officials - how it can be done equitably.

Should age and maturity level play a role in response to juvenile crime? Do you believe that age and maturity levels aggravate or mitigate circumstances when responding to juvenile crime?

Should the response be based solely on the offense committed by a juvenile delinquent? Explain your answer with examples.

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Factors impacting levels of maturity in youths and their significance while dealing with juvenile offenders.

Neurological factors have been proven scientifically to affect the level of maturity in juvenile offenders up until young adulthood. This is why the legal drinking age is 21 while juveniles are considered adults at 18. Juveniles' cognitive ability to rationalize their decision-making is limited until they reach the age of maturity of 18 under the law. Therefore, unless violent crimes are committed, juveniles are typically remanded into juvenile jurisdiction for actions that fall outside of the rules of the law.

An assessment of the factors affecting maturity ...

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The following posting discusses differentiating juvenile and adult offenders.

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