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    Federico Garcia Lorca's "Lament for Ignacio Sanchez Mejias"

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    Give your interpretation of Federico Garcia Lorca's "Lament for Ignacio Sanchez Mejias."

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 11:56 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/prose/621257

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    I interpret Federico Garcia Lorca's "Lament for Ignacio Sanchez Mejias" as a piece about the nature of bereavement and death. It also demonstrates the power of love and loss of a good friend.

    Just as the poem is allocated into four sections, this structure seems to mimic the bereavement process and its stages as well. It begins with the poet's recognition of his friend's death as he recalls how "It was exactly five in the afternoon. A boy brought the white sheet at five in the afternoon." The ability to remember the exact time and place when we learn of a loved one's death is common and powerful about loss and mourning. One component is the viewing or funeral as the poet reflects on the difficulty of saying good-bye as "I don't want to cover his face with handkerchiefs /that he may get used to the death he carries. Go, Ignacio, feel not the hot bellowing /Sleep, fly, rest: even the sea dies!"

    As far as poetic devices, personification is used effectively when he elucidates how "Death laid eggs in the wound at five in the afternoon." Simile is also employed with "The wounds were burning like suns." Repetition is also used to show how we process death with continuous shock with "at five in the afternoon. "

    The bullfighter's strength and legacy is also explained at the time of his demise with "Like a river of lions was his marvelous strength, and like a marble torso his firm drawn moderation." These words indicate the despite such skill and fame, the bullfighter could not escape death.

    The connection with death and nature in a cyclical manner is also expressed by the poet. For example, he suggests that "Now the moss and the grass/open with sure fingers/ the flower of his skull. And now his blood comes out singing; singing along marshes and meadows, sliden on frozen horns..."

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 11:56 pm ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/prose/621257

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