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Amory Blaine's Character

This solution chooses a character from the novel, "This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald." It then briefly explains what makes that character uniquely American. It alludes to some facts that show Amory's example of the American spirit.

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As you briefly select a character from This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald and explain what makes that character uniquely American, I would choose Amory Blaine, the protagonist, though some critics might disagree.

He seems to exemplify various American ideologies, American virtues, elements of democratic thinking, the assertion of free will, and the pursuit of the American dream, a sense of both idealism and cynicism, and self-knowledge, in this book, for starters. He also seems to crave more meaning and deeper purpose for his own life and for the future at large. When Beatrice, his mom, remarks that America may be "the great coming nation--yet" (22), it further shows this idealistic notion that the future can be greater than now. Amory is even described in the book as "a cynical idealist" (84).

In addition to idealism, he also shows immense cynicism, another trait that we as Americans often depict, especially when we criticize our government. This critical mood is strongly evoked in the novel as the new generation, Amory's, was "...dedicated more than the last to the fear of poverty and the worship of success; grown up to find all Gods dead, all wars fought, all faiths in man shaken" (282). Americans can be quite cynical, since democratic thinking allows us to voice our opinions and even objections. This skeptical trait permeates Amory's ...

Solution Summary

1000 words and textual evidence are briefly offered to describe makes a character uniquely American in Fitzgerald's This Side of Paradise.