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Eugene O'Neills "The Hairy Ape"

Please read the story located on page 180 of the attached document.

O'Neill's method in The Hairy Ape demonstrates a striking departure from traditional stage drama since audiences are faced with an exaggerated and stark realism, and with dialog that is crude, natural, and slangy. What happens to Yank that leads him to expose his primitive interior self? What happens at the end, and how are we, the reader or viewing audience to interpret his death?

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I am having trouble identifying what happens to Yank that leads him to expose his primitive interior self? What happens at the end, and how are we, the reader or viewing audience to interpret his death?

There was a series of events that lead Yank to expose his primitive inner self- somewhat of a lifetime of oppression and disappointment in the inequalities of society. Let us begin by discussing some of these events that lead up to his realization at the end:

Yank, from The Hairy Ape, was a firefighter on board of a steamship who happened to be a very unattractive man. Despite his unattractiveness, he seemed to have quite a large ego. He sees himself as the leader of all firemen on board the steamship and one who the entire industrial word depends on. Most importantly, he feels that he "belongs."

Yank found a special place aboard the ship where he 'belongs' which is a stokehole on the ship. When he is here, he feels truly happy with life. However, one day his happiness is taken away when Mildred Douglas who is a rich society woman (and whose father owns the steel company ...

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The solution discusses Eugene O'Neills "The Hairy Ape."

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