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Thinking Styles and Critical Thinking

Compare and contrast the three different types of thinking and comment on how each affects the critical-thinking process. Finally, apply critical thinking to the decision-making process by discussing workplace examples that highlight each of the three different types of thinking you have examined in this paper.

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There are many different models of thinking styles. Let's go with Sternberg's model of mental self-government. I also attached two additional resources on this theory.

1. Compare and contrast the three different types of thinking and comment on how each affects the critical-thinking process.

According to Sternberg's global model (1999), there are four learning styles classified according to his theory of mental self-government, monarchic, hierarchic, oligarchic and anarchic. Monarchic thinkers are people who perform best when goals are singular - they deal best with one goal or need at a time. Hierarchic thinkers are those people who can focus on multiple goals at once and recognize that all goals cannot be fulfilled equally and can prioritize goals easily. On the other hand, oligarchic thinkers are people that deal well with goals that are of equal weight, but they have difficulty prioritizing goals of different weight. Finally, anarchic thinkers are people that depart from form and precedent. Often they don't like or understand the need for rules and regulations. They operate without rules or structure, creating their own problem-solving techniques with insights that often easily break existing mindsets (Sternberg, 1999).

Sternberg (1999) further categorize these global thinking styles according to three functional styles: legislative (e.g. creating, planning, imagining, and formulating) executive (e.g. a implementing and doing ) and judicial (e.g. judging, evaluating, and comparing.). Higher level legislative thinking is involved in critical thinking and problem solving, but it also involves executive and judicial thinking. In fact, according to Sternberg, thinking have different levels (global, local), scope (internal e.g. like to be by themselves, and external e.g. like to collaborate and work in groups) and leanings (liberal and conservative) of learning styles. For example, global ...

Solution Summary

This solution compares and contrasts the three different types of thinking and comments on how each affects the critical-thinking process. Finally,it applies critical thinking to the decision-making process by discussing workplace examples that highlight each of the three different types of thinking. References in APA style. Supplemented with two additional resoruces for further research.

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