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    Teaching Digital Kids

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    Please read the attached file from Teaching the Digital Generation and answer the questions:

    1. How is instruction in our schools geared to the minds of today's Information Age students?

    2. How are you using Information Age resources for learning in your classrooms?

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com October 10, 2019, 3:25 am ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/education/learning-teaching/teaching-digital-kids-419447

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    Teaching Digital Kids
    Please read the attached file from "Teaching the Digital Generation" and answer the questions:

    1. How is instruction in our schools geared to the minds of today's Information Age students?
    Instruction in our schools is NOT currently geared to the minds of today's information-age students according to the article. The reason for this has to do with how the brain works. There is a feature of the brain called neuroplasticity, which is the brain's ability to reorganize how it processes information based on new input. The process of neuroplasticity takes place as a child learns to read. Consistent exposure to textual input on a daily basis reorganizes the brain's processes so that the brain can make sense of it. Children growing up in a digital world are being exposed to new kinds of input from digital experiences for sustained periods of time on a daily basis, and their brains are reorganizing to handle this digital environment more effectively. These children are quite literally thinking differently than those who currently teach them. The children have started to make a shift in thinking about our new age, but the system that teaches them has not!
    There are differences that exist between the way "digital kids" process information and learn as a result of their experiences and the way in which the non-digital adults teach. Digital learners want information delivered quickly and from multimedia sources, they want to parallel process and multi-task, they want active and engaged learning, they want to process pictures, sounds, and video before text, they want random access to hyperlinked information, and they want to network and collaborate with one another. Teachers trained in a non-digital system prefer a slow and controlled release of information at a conventional speed and from very limited sources. Many teachers trained via a non-digital system prefer singular processing and single tasks at a time, and would rather begin with a lecture or text to proceed through a lesson. These teachers also tend to proceed in a linear, logical, and sequential fashion when delivering information. They also want students to work independently without any ...

    Solution Summary

    Instruction in our schools is NOT currently geared to the minds of today's information-age students according to the article. The reason for this has to do with how the brain works. There is a feature of the brain called neuroplasticity, which is the brain's ability to reorganize how it processes information based on new input. The process of neuroplasticity takes place as a child learns to read. Consistent exposure to textual input on a daily basis reorganizes the brain's processes so that the brain can make sense of it. Children growing up in a digital world are being exposed to new kinds of input from digital experiences for sustained periods of time on a daily basis, and their brains are reorganizing to handle this digital environment more effectively. These children are quite literally thinking differently than those who currently teach them. The children have started to make a shift in thinking about our new age, but the system that teaches them has not!
    There are differences that exist between the way "digital kids" process information and learn as a result of their experiences and the way in which the non-digital adults teach. Digital learners want information delivered quickly and from multimedia sources, they want to parallel process and multi-task, they want active and engaged learning, they want to process pictures, sounds, and video before text, they want random access to hyperlinked information, and they want to network and collaborate with one another. Teachers trained in a non-digital system prefer a slow and controlled release of information at a conventional speed and from very limited sources. Many teachers trained via a non-digital system prefer singular processing and single tasks at a time, and would rather begin with a lecture or text to proceed through a lesson. These teachers also tend to proceed in a linear, logical, and sequential fashion when delivering information. They also want students to work independently without any interaction.

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