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    Language Development and Kuhl's Research

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    Throughout the early stages of life, infants and children experiment with communicative attempts through crying, eye gaze, gesturing, cooing, and then eventually speaking. Based on Kuhl's work, how do you feel language develops in infancy? How should language be supported in infancy and early childhood and would that support method differ for children with special needs?

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    https://brainmass.com/education/learning-teaching/language-development-kuhls-research-493350

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    Kuhl is best known for her work on early language development. She has been involved in studies that show how young children learn. Her research has demonstrated how early exposure to language can alter the brain and the neuropathways that develop. Her research has also shown that there are critical periods in a child's development in which language growth is optimal. Her research can also apply to topics such as bilingual education, being ready for reading, how to work with children with disabilities involving language, and how infants begin to discriminate speech sounds to those of their native language.

    I personally believe Kuhl's research is correct. I have had two children and have noticed the same development patterns in each of them. In early infancy, they use whatever means they can communicate. That usually means crying, cooing, and using their eyes. After a few months, they will begin to mimic facial expressions, such as smiling and frowning. They start to show facial expressions that indicate surprise, fright, and pain. Eventually, they begin to babble and speak. My youngest daughter learned sign language and this delayed her speech development by about 3 months. However, once she began to speak, she quickly caught up and then surpassed her peers in how much she was saying.

    The implications of her research are that children need to be in a language-rich environment from infancy. They need to be touched, held, and interacted with. So much of what children learn early on is nonverbal language and behavior. Thus, you cannot simply just talk to babies, they need to see and interact with many people. Another implication is that the best time to learn multiple languages is during the critical period for language development when children are learning to focus on their native language sounds. As far as children with special needs, they have some of the same basic needs as all children. However, some children are deaf or blind and will need additional help learning the nonverbal language and behavior that they cannot readily experience.

    Good luck.

    Miriam Robertson, MA

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com October 2, 2022, 11:23 am ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/education/learning-teaching/language-development-kuhls-research-493350

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