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Non-English Student - Intervention for Math Problems

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Please list several interventions that teachers would use to help a non-English speaking student exceed in math?

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https://brainmass.com/education/esl-ell/nonenglish-student-intervention-math-problems-25855

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Please see response file attached. I have provided several types of interventions that teachers would use to help a non-English speaking student(s) exceed in math. I have attached an article that you may find helpful and many other on-line articles that are highly relevant.

Research suggests that the essential math objectives identified by local school jurisdictions should remain unchanged for literacy math students. In literacy math curricula, however, the objectives are clustered and condensed, modifying the scope and sequence. Next, specialized teaching strategies are developed. All the strategies take into account students' ages, English proficiency, and developmental levels.
1. Strategies based on Life Experiences. Develop strategies that take into account previous life experiences (based on the age of student) (i.e., For high school students who are studying ordinal numbers, the teacher could provide them practice with ordinal numbers by having them identify the periods of their school schedules or by explaining the order of their lockers in the hallways.)
Example 1:
Innovative strategies need to be developed for 17 year-old students with beginning English skills, as well as for fourth graders whose first school experience is in an American setting. Older students benefit particularly from math curricula that take into account their previous life experiences, such as problems involving money or their new school environment. For example, high school students who are studying ordinal numbers could be given practice identifying the periods of their school schedules or explaining the order of their lockers in the hallways.
Example 2:
The fourth grade math literacy student faces a smaller developmental gap with peers, yet may still need a period of specialized instruction. The texts and materials that native English speakers use to learn about ordinal numbers may not interest a student whose previous learning experience has never originated in books. Instruction with concrete experiences, especially incorporating math manipulatives, is effective bridges to formal math class education for literacy math students of all ages.
2. Paying attention to Language.
Based on the students 'English Proficiency' the teaching strategy is this: the classroom will be enriched with extra attention to language (i.e., Charts with important vocabulary and language structures fill the walls, along with writing by the teacher and students).
Example:
In a lesson on ordinal numbers, beginning proficiency students could complete ...

Solution Summary

This solution discusses several interventions that teachers would use to help a non-English speaking student exceed in math. Supplemented with an article that further discusses this topic.

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