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Human Resources: Legislation

Choose a current topic/issue focusing on legislation (i.e.policies, governmental mandates, etc...) in human resource management. Research both sides of the issue posed by supporters and non-supporters of the topic. Include

a) 1 complete, academic journal article (no link, actual article) that supports the "Yes" response to the question

b) 1 complete, academic journal article (no link, actual article) that supports the "No" response to the question

c) 1 write-up of no less than 1000 words, no more than 1500 words in which the you provide your stance on the question, along with an educated reasoning for your decision. Include other reliable sources, current or past events that support their stance, and personal experiences (be careful with these, as you do not want to come across as uninformed and judgmental). Opinions must be grounded by evidence, theory, previous case, or other factual material. Supporting documents, references (APA format, 6th edition), and/or materials must be supplied.

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These notes have to deal with whether or not employers and HR personnel should be permitted to require employees to reveal their HIV status.

HIV Notification in the Workplace - Yes or No?

When HIV and AIDS first became known back in the early 1980s, there was rightful panic throughout many sectors of American society. Because so little was known about the disease, individuals wanted to know when someone that they were close was infected with the virus so they could make their own individuals decision as to whether or not they wanted to have contact. While from a sexual partner standpoint, notification was mandatory during those early years, Human Resources departments around the country have struggled with policies related to mandatory HIV notification laws. Over the years, the types of situations where such reporting is mandatory has dwindled significantly, and most individuals are granted confidentiality in their diagnosis. It is up to them whether or not they want to let others know that they have contracted the disease. In fact, many companies and public institutions have developed policies specifically grinding confidentiality to their employees, and it is not required that an individual's status be revealed in the workplace, unless required by law for certain positions. Over the years, Western society has adopted strict policies for handling any blood or bodily fluid, including needles, and properly disinfecting or disposing of such material. Because this is such a standard practice, many would argue that there is no longer the need to disclose one's status to those around them, including coworker. There are strong arguments on both sides of this issue, both with well reasoned facts supporting them, but the reality is the confidentiality ...

Solution Summary

The academic journal articles are completed. Current topic/issue focusing on legislation are given.