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Landscapes Fashioned by Water?

Wind is included along with gravity, water, and ice as an agent of erosion. In many national parks and other areas of natural beauty, statements are often made that credit wind as having sculpted the landscape. Briefly discuss the importance of wind as an agent of erosion and explain why such statements are probably inaccurate.

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Hi,

This is an interesting topic! Let's take a closer look through discussion and an extra resource attached for extra reading.

RESPONSE:

1. Briefly discuss the importance of wind as an agent of erosion and explain why such statements are probably inaccurate.

Erosion is displacement of solids (sediment, soil, mud, rock and other particles) usually by the agents of currents such as, wind, water, or ice by downward or down-slope movement in response to gravity or by living organisms (in the case of bioerosion). Wind, alone, however, has little power as an agent of erosion, and works together with water and other geologic factors (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erosion). The exception to this rule is in the desert, where winds are prevailing and sand is easily transported. Wind is common in arid desert regions because the air near the surface is heated and rises; cooler air comes in to replace hot rising air and this movement of air results in winds. Second, arid regions (desert) have little or no soil moisture to hold rock and mineral fragments, so the wind has the ability to transport, erode, and deposit sediment (see attached resource for a detailed discussion).

However, in explaining the sculpting ...

Solution Summary

Wind is included along with gravity, water, and ice as an agent of erosion. In many national parks and other areas of natural beauty, statements are often made that credit wind as having sculpted the landscape. This solution briefly discusses the importance of wind as an agent of erosion and explains why such statements are probably inaccurate. Supplemented with an article that discusses the wind as a geologic agent.

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