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Computer of the 1980s

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I need to write an argumentative essay on the following:

How fair a description is it to say that the computer of the 1980s has been completely reinvented with sociability purposes in mind?

Can you give me some related websites that I can use in my essay?

I also want to know your personal opinion about this topic. What would your thesis statement be and how would you go about arguing it? What would be your main points?

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How fair a description is it to say that the computer of the 1980s has been completely reinvented with sociability purposes in mind?
My personal opinion is that the computer has indeed been reinvented over the past few years for social purposes. It has evolved from something that was used mainly for manufacturing and processing purposes to something much more than that. We now use the computer for communication purposes just as much, if not more, than what we use for manufacturing and processing. As the computer has advanced in technology, so have the expectations of the consumer. We now expect that with each coming generation, computers will be faster and will allow us to communicate more efficiently. It is because of the consumer's expectations that computer companies have focused their technological design on trying to make the consumer happy. If the consumer is happy, the computer company will have more sales. The more advanced computers that are out there, the more that society will change.
I also want to know your personal opinion about this topic. What would your thesis statement be and how would you go about arguing it? What would be your main points?
Can you imagine a time when you did not check your email at least once a day? Email has become so prevalent that it has become one of the most preferred modes of communication. This has happened because of the incredible advances in computer technology over the last few decades. For example, when Apple produced their first computer back in 1976, its computer processor had a speed of 1 megahertz per second. The recently released PowerMac G4 has a processing speed of 1.65 Gigahertz per second. As technology has improved, so has the communication of the people that utilize these machines.
Main Points
• I would start the paper by discussing a brief history of the computer. I would elaborate on how computer companies have tried to make their computers more user friendly in order to increase sales and increase customer satisfaction.
• I would then move into how society has changed as a result of computer advancements.
• After that I would lead into expectations for society and the computer in the future.
The Macintosh computer has never lacked for enthusiasts ready to paint the machine with cosmic significance. More than any other personal computer, the Mac comes wrapped in hype, most of it directly traceable to Steven Jobs, former chairman of Apple. He loved to tell his designers that the computer they were building -- with its icons, its pull-down menus and its mouse -- would not only change the world, but also "put a dent in the universe." As if to hammer his point home to the rest of America, Jobs launched the new machine in January 1984 with the famously melodramatic commercial -- aired just once, during the Super Bowl -- in which a woman clad in a Mac T-shirt smashed a screen image meant to represent the brain-dead PCs of archrival IBM, the Big Brother of computing.
The heavy-handed marketing campaign, as any business-school student can testify, worked for a while and then backfired. After an initial spurt of sales, word got out that the radical new machine was annoyingly underpowered and grossly overpriced -- a yuppie toy. Although Apple eventually solved most of the computer's problems, IBM compatibles still dominate the personal-computer business. The Macintosh today remains stuck in a niche, with a market share that hovers around 10%.
But a look at the information landscape 10 years after the launch suggests that the Macintosh may turn out to be almost as important as Jobs promised. Not only have the icons and pointing devices pioneered by Apple become ubiquitous -- both on rival computers and on new vehicles being ...

Solution Summary

The expert examines computers of the 1980s.

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