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Supply Chain

1. An undisputable source of gathering competitive intelligence is competitors' customers. What makes them choose a competitor's product is a central question in gaining competitive intelligence. I have over the years noticed that some firms actually prevent their customers from talking with/to potential competitors. They do this by actually discrediting potential competitors to the eyes of the customer. I have wondered how legal this is. Do you have some perspectives on this?

2. How would you say an organization can create flexibility within the master production schedule, and how would such flexibility affect the production flow?

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1. An undisputable source of gathering competitive intelligence is competitors' customers. What makes them choose a competitor's product is a central question in gaining competitive intelligence. I have over the years noticed that some firms actually prevent their customers from talking with/to potential competitors. They do this by actually discrediting potential competitors to the eyes of the customer. I have wondered how legal this is. Do you have some perspectives on this?

I did soe research on this question, and I did not find anything on the Internet that pertains to the legality of limiting customers to one company in order to remain competitive. In my opinion, I believe that it limits the consumer and their freedom to shop where one chooses to at that time. In fact, I would go as far as claiming that it is unconstitutional because of the fact that the First Amendment is breached and individual rights are limited. This is not fair to anyone wanting to purchase ...

Solution Summary

This solution discusses competitive intelligence and flexibility within a master production schedule.

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