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ERP Design Strategy

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How might a project team recommending an ERP design strategy justify its recommendation as compared with other types of design strategies?

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[Student: The followingis also attached as a Word document]

Student,
I have worked in the field of designing, building, and supporting ERP systems for nearly fifteen years. For an enterprise (the "E" in ERP), the ERP design strategy like all aspects of this very important capital investment is about ROI: Return On Investment. How soon can a return begin and what will the total return be? Your question is specifically about ERP design strategy which is one phase, an initial phase. Considerations similar to what I am about to say can be considered for other phases, such as development, implementation, support, and end of life.
I can guarantee you that a competent project team recommending an ERP design strategy will justify its recommendation as compared with other types of design strategies based largely if not entirely on attributes of that plan will produce a quick and complete return on that investment. Specifically, some considerations may be:
- Will the design support outsourcing so that staffing needs during ...

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Solution is a 680-word Word document covering current and recent considerations an ERP project team will consider.

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Organizations are often plagued with the deterrent of unpredictability within the supply/demand chain. An organization's positioning in the marketplace will determine the level of comprehensive planning and level of inventory control management that is required for maintaining daily operations. For example, organizations within the electronics industry must be aware of the constant need to upgrade products and services to meet overwhelming consumer demands, yet remain knowledgeable of the organizations current inventory structure, i.e., product shelf life- cycle, as well as product replenishment cycles. Many organizations utilize JIT (Just-In-Time) as a means of eliminating excessive waste of unsold products and outdated materials. Another example is in the publishing industry, in which case authors and publishers opt to function as a P.O.D. (Print-on-Demand) provider. P.O.D. is a metOrganizations are often plagued with the deterrent of unpredictability within the supply/demand chain.

Organizations are often plagued with the deterrent of unpredictability within the supply/demand chain. An organization's positioning in the marketplace will determine the level of comprehensive planning and level of inventory control management that is required for maintaining daily operations. For example, organizations within the electronics industry must be aware of the constant need to upgrade products and services to meet overwhelming consumer demands, yet remain knowledgeable of the organizations current inventory structure, i.e., product shelf life- cycle, as well as product replenishment cycles. Many organizations utilize JIT (Just-In-Time) as a means of eliminating excessive waste of unsold products and outdated materials. Another example is in the publishing industry, in which case authors and publishers opt to function as a P.O.D. (Print-on-Demand) provider. P.O.D. is a metOrganizations are often plagued with the deterrent of unpredictability within the supply/demand chain.

An organization's positioning in the marketplace will determine the level of comprehensive planning and level of inventory control management that is required for maintaining daily operations. For example, organizations within the electronics industry must be aware of the constant need to upgrade products and services to meet overwhelming consumer demands, yet remain knowledgeable of the organizations current inventory structure, i.e., product shelf life- cycle, as well as product replenishment cycles. Many organizations utilize JIT (Just-In-Time) as a means of eliminating excessive waste of unsold products and outdated materials. Another example is in the publishing industry, in which case authors and publishers opt to function as a P.O.D. (Print-on-Demand) provider. P.O.D. is a method in which organizations reduce inventory while simultaneously meeting or exceeding consumer demand for publication resources. For instance, a writer will prepare a document for publication, and determine the method in which he/she would want to publish that document.

The author may have a couple of options that may include; working with a traditional publishing house, or self-publishing. If the author decides to self-publish, for example, his/her product will be available based on consumer demand instead of having excess products sitting on store shelves taking up space. P.O.D. eliminates unnecessary inventory and gives consumers the option of purchasing the author of choice found within the organizations online storefront. In most cases, P.O.D. contributed to the closures of several bookstores unable to compete in an e-commerce dominant marketplace. Most organizations lose profitability when unused inventory remains on the shelves; in essence, unused inventory is more of a liability to an organization considering the fact that an organization is obligated gets rid of unused inventory. Many organizations liquidate as a result of poor planning, mismanagement of control processes, or misappropriation of funds, or exceeding debt. Another example of organizations that exercise an alternative method of controlling inventory is AVON.

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