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Yerkes-Dodson: Theory of Stress

Yerkes-Dodson states that some stress is necessary to create high work performance. What are the implications of this? What are the problems with it?

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Q: Yerkes-Dodson states that some stress is necessary to create high work performance. What are the implications of this? What are the problems with it?

First, let's look a little closer at the Yerkes-Dodson Law below:

Yerkes-Dodson law - Arousal Arousal

Arousal is a major aspect of many learning theories and is closely related to other concepts such as anxiety, attention, agitation, stress, and motivation. The arousal level can be thought of as how much capacity you have available to work with. One finding with respect to arousal is the Yerkes-Dodson law (first observed by Robert M. Yerkes and John D. Dodson, The Relation of Strength of Stimulus to Rapidity of Habit-Formation (1908) Journal of Comparative Neurology and Psychology, 18, 459-482). It predicts an inverted U-shaped function between arousal and performance. A certain amount of arousal can be a motivator toward change (with change in this discussion being learning). Too much or ...

Solution Summary

This solution explains the implications and limitations of the theory posited by Yerkes-Dodson, which states that some stress is necessary to create high work performance. Supplemented with one highly relevant article.

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