Explore BrainMass
Share

economics assumes that people are selfish?

This content was STOLEN from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

1 Short Paragraph of discussion needed

One of the key concepts of economics necessarily deals with constrained choices that people make, based on the process of subjectively weighing the perceived costs and perceived benefits of future possible actions.

If people are always weighing costs against benefits, and making choices that presumably benefit themselves, does this mean that economics assumes that people are selfish? What is the relationship between selfishness and economic reasoning?

© BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com October 24, 2018, 10:57 pm ad1c9bdddf
https://brainmass.com/business/organizational-economics/economics-assumes-that-people-are-selfish-176269

Solution Preview

Economists do not assume that individuals are selfish. Economists assume that people are purposeful and prudent. The purposes, the ends, could be selfish---die with the most money in the bank. But they could also be generous or noble. A person has ends, goals, loves, priorities, projects, dreams, things that are important to her.

If she's "prudent" by an economic definition she uses the means to ...

Solution Summary

One of the key concepts of economics necessarily deals with constrained choices that people make, based on the process of subjectively weighing the perceived costs and perceived benefits of future possible actions.

If people are always weighing costs against benefits, and making choices that presumably benefit themselves, does this mean that economics assumes that people are selfish? What is the relationship between selfishness and economic reasoning?

$2.19
See Also This Related BrainMass Solution

Business Ethics References

I have to respond to each question and reference a different ethical theory for each question. The ethical theories that can be used are as follows:

Kant
Egoism
Libertarianism
Utilitarianism
Rawlsianism

1) Is drug testing an unwarranted invasion of employee privacy? Which is more important--getting drugs out of the workplace or protecting the privacy of the employee?

2) What about other health-threatening activities, i.e. smoking outside of working hours, unprotected sex, etc. Should employers be able to question or test employees or potential employees about these activities?

3) Should employers be allowed to use polygraph tests to screen out potentially costly employees who may engage in illegal drug use or any of these activities?

I'm having trouble with the ethical theories and would appreciate assistance.

If you feel that my bid is to low, please get back to me.

Thank You

View Full Posting Details