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What are important considerations for an organization dispose of old computer equipment? What method would work best for a retail organization?

Why is it recommended to establish a formal evaluation criterion when considering the purchase of hardware for the organization?

Are any of the criteria from the wireless laptop article applicable to any other types of hardware to be purchased for a retail organization?

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Business, Information Systems
Year 3
Computer Information System
Hi,
Let's take a closer look.
1. What are important considerations for an organization to dispose of old computer equipment? What method would work best for a retail organization?

According to one source, three important considerations for an organization when disposing of old computer equipment are as follows:
1) Make sure that all of the data has been uploaded to a server and then wipe the hard drive at least 3 times to destroy any information, which may remain on the hard drive.
2) Determine if the equipment is to be sold to a jobber or is to be dismantled or destroyed. There are requirements in some states for the proper disposal of this kind of material. If it is to be resold, then a contract needs to be written outlining its use (see article attached below, which discusses this further, p. 2-3).
3) Some organizations will sell off old equipment to employees but with the contractural agreement that once sold, the company is absolved of all responsibility for the equipment http://experts.about.com/q/Geography-1729/computers-information-process-1.htm
These considerations apply equally to a retail organization. Also see article attached below for other considerations.

2. Why is it recommended to establish a formal evaluation criterion when considering the purchase of hardware for the organization? Are any of the criteria from the wireless laptop article applicable to any other types of hardware to be purchased for a retail organization?
Establishing a formal evaluation criterion addresses several problems. One of the problems faced by organizations, for example, is that the equipment is of various ages with different softwares and thus cannot communicate well. One of the keys to eliminating this problem is a formal evaluation criterion, such as to fixate on one brand and to maintain a constant cycle of upgrades to both hardware and software. No hardware or software should go for more then 3 years before the replacement cycle begins again. This evaluation criterion should be rolling in nature with all of the software being upgraded via the server network all at one time. This ensures that all of the machines can communicate at the same level and that all of them have the same protection packages. http://experts.about.com/q/Geography-1729/computers-information-process-1.htm
Lap tops fit into this scenario just as much as towers. In addition, laptops must have more sophisticated protective software to act as a firewall to the main system as well as the machine itself.
In fact, the IT department should have 100% control over all softwares to be purchased and make a clear policy that no unauthorized software may be on these machines. http://experts.about.com/q/Geography-1729/computers-information-process-1.htm
FINAL COMMENTS I HOPE THIS HELPS AND TAKE CARE.
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Bid Credits: 1 Deadline: September 27, 2006, 10:41 pm EDT

Disposal of Old Computer Equipment
A Mounting Environmental Problem
By Michael J. Meyer, Waleed Abu El Ella, and Ronald M. Young
Most organizations have been collecting obsolete computers for years. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has estimated that 45 million computers will become obsolete annually by 2005. California, Massachusetts, and Minnesota have already outlawed the disposal of computer waste in landfills; in 2003 alone, 23 states initiated legislation to address the mounting problem of computer waste (Exhibit).
Most of the environmental concerns with computers lie with the monitor, specifically its cathode ray tube (CRT). Each color monitor contains, on average, four to five pounds of lead, considered hazardous waste when disposed of, according to EPA standards. Computers also contain other hazardous materials, including mercury, cadmium (a known carcinogen), and hexavalent chromium (shown to cause high blood pressure, iron-poor blood, liver disease, and nerve and brain damage in animals). The Utah Department of ...

Solution Summary

Concerning aspects of a computer information system, this solution examines the questions e.g. disposing old computer equipment, formal evaluation criteria, etc.

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