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Medical Privacy & Medical Records

Nothing is at greater risk in terms of privacy than our medical records. Do you agree? Why would you or should you care? If you do care, are there any circumstances that would make you feel otherwise? Examples to highlight the pros and cons to help make your case would be great! Then, outline issues of medical privacy.

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Please see response attached, which is also presented below.

RESPONSE:

Interesting questions! Let's take a closer look through discussion, example, and supplementary resources.

1. Nothing is at greater risk in terms of privacy than our medical records. Do you agree?

Most people would agree with this statement due to information abuse issues and just because it is their personal information that no one else has a right to see unless the individual agrees. It is a patient's right (see http://www.patientprivacyrights.org/site/PageServer).

Indeed, since the creation of the Hippocratic oath about 400 B.C., protecting the privacy of patients has been an important part of physicians' code of conduct. Over time, health information has come into use by many organizations and individuals who are not subject to medical ethics codes, including employers, insurers, government program administrators, attorneys and others. As uses of medical information multiplied, so have regulatory protections for this highly sensitive and deeply personal information. http://www.epic.org/privacy/medical/

Whatsoever things I see or hear concerning the life of men, in my attentance on the sick or even apart therefrom, which ought not be noised abroad, I will keep silence thereon, counting such things to be as sacred secrets.
- Oath of Hippocrates, 4th ...

Solution Summary

This solution evaluates the statement: Nothing is at greater risk in terms of privacy than our medical records. It also discusses why a person should care and, if a person does care, circumstances that would make a person feel otherwise are explored. Examples are provided. It also outlines medical privacy issues through discussion and supplementary articles.

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