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    Comparing Leadership Theories

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    Recent theoretical developments in leadership paradigms seem more inclined to frame leadership concepts within the context of moral philosophy, interpersonal growth and spiritual values, topics discussed in business leadership models. Some examples include transformational leadership (Burns, 1978; Bass, 1990), Servant-Leadership (Greenleaf Center, n.d.), Relational Leadership (Brower, Schoorman, & Hwee, 2000) and spiritual leadership.

    Conduct a preliminary search of these models, and select one that resonates best with your own leadership style. Using the business article search engines in the Library and other credible sources, respond to the following questions regarding the model you have selected:

    Select two and compare and contrast these two models, with particular emphasis on the implications of these models for the leader follower-relationship and the organizational culture.

    To what degree do these models represent a theory that is grounded in experience or fact, or just a "fad"? Defend your arguments with academic sources.

    (please use citations, and do not use references from brainmass solution library)

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    Solution Preview

    Hi,

    Interesting questions! Lets' look at the transformational leadership (Burns, 1978; Bass, 1990) and the Servant-Leadership (Greenleaf Center, n.d.), which you can draw on for your final copy.

    1. TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADER (e.g. Burns, 1978)

    Transformational Moral Value Leaders - lead with transcendent values (the ends over means). According to Burns, transcendent values include:
    Liberty
    Justice
    Equality
    Collective Well Being

    E.g. Heroic charismatic leaders e.g., Moses (http://business.nmsu.edu/~dboje/teaching/338/transformational_leadership.htm).

    According to Boje (2000), many readers miss the fact that for Burns' leadership, be it transactional or transformational, was about moral values, and amoral power-wielders did not qualify as leaders (p. 20). In this sense, Boje suggests, the duality and hierarchy of amoral, transactional-means, and transformational-ends is based on Burns' theory of power and psychological motives. "All leaders are actual or potential power holders, but not all power holders are leaders" (p. 18). And psychological the power wielders are distinguished from leaders, because the former "treat people as things" and real "leaders do not obliterate followers' motives" (p. 18). At the top of the leadership pyramid is the transformational leader who "converts followers into leaders and may convert leaders into moral agents" (P. 4) (source: http://business.nmsu.edu/~dboje/teaching/338/transformational_leadership.htm).

    In transformational leadership style, the power is shared in the leader-follower relationship, so the relationship is vertical, with the leader influencing ...

    Solution Summary

    This solution assists in examines and compares two leadership theories, with particular emphasis on the implications of these models for the leader follower-relationship and the organizational culture. It also assists in examining to what degree these models represent a theory that is grounded in experience or fact, or just a "fad." Supplemented with articles on two theories e.g. transformational and servant leadership.

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