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Brick and Mortar & eBusiness Marketing

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1. What are the similarities between "brick and mortar" and eBusiness marketing?

2. What are the differences between "brick and mortar" and eBusiness marketing?

3. Why do some people say portal Web sites are very similar to television channels?

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https://brainmass.com/business/e-commerce/brick-mortar-ebusiness-marketing-92712

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1. What are the similarities between "brick and mortar" and eBusiness marketing?

Not all authors agree to the similarities and difference, but there seems to be some general themes. For example, the steps to successful marketing and implementation are similar between "brick and mortar" and eBusiness marketing and include:
1) Analyzing your customers and the business environment in order to
2) Identify key opportunities to better and more profitably meet customer needs,
3) Figuring out how to act on those opportunities, and then
4) Implementing your plan (Kyle, n.d.).
The process doesn't have to be cumbersome. Five-year plans and novel-length documents are not required. The logic of the action is what is important. By applying the basic marketing process, rather than a tactic here and a technique there, your chances of success skyrocket for both "brick and mortar" and eBusiness marketing alike (Kyle, n.d.).
Similar to 'Brick and mortar" organization, e-businesses are faced with a dynamic environment that requires flexibility and structural abilities to rapidly react to the turbulence of market changes which IMPACT their marketing strategies similarly. For example, the literature on traditional and entrepreneurial organizations has established the crucial role that structural dimensions play in the performance and the success of such organizations. Similarly, the same conclusions can be implemented in e-business and e-commerce organizations (Geisler, 2001).

Geisler (2001) also points out several similarities in structure and design between "brick and mortar" and e-business that are related to marketing. In fact, he argues that both are better served when they adopt a structure that offers flexibility and organicity— measured by design dimensions of formalization, departmentation, centralization, and complexity. Thus, e-commerce organizations can learn from the experience of "brick-and-mortar and new ventures. The relationship between environment, marketing strategy, and structure is as relevant to e-business as it is to traditional "brick and mortar" organizations.

Geisler (2001) reports further that as we accumulate empirical knowledge on this relationship environment, marketing strategy, and structure, we may now address the unique attributes of e-business by asserting that this knowledge (from traditional brick-and-mortar") is highly relevant to e-business structuring and to their marketing success. Any organization, whether "brick" or "click," when faced with the challenges of a highly dynamic external environment, must employ its design dimension and marketing strategies in such a manner as to provide it with adequate agility and organicity, so that drastic strategic choices, including marketing choices, may be implemented in a timely and successful fashion.

Other similarities between "brick and mortar" and e-Business marketing are pointed out in ...

Solution Summary

This solution addresses the following questions: What are the similarities between "brick and mortar" and eBusiness
marketing? What are the differences between "brick and mortar" and eBusiness marketing? Why do some people say portal Web sites are very similar to television channels?

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