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Operations Management Simulations

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According to these three simulations, 1) "Process Control and Problem Solving" Simulation,2) Managing a Process Layout Simulation, and 3) Inventory Management SImulation.

- What are lessons learned relative to the importance and effectiveness of process control, managing process layouts, and inventory management?

- As a result of using the simulations, what concepts and analytic tools were you able to use in the development of your Operations Improvement Plan (i.e., how did you apply what you learned)?

- What do your results reveal about the challenges facing operations managers?

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According to these three simulations, 1) "Process Control and Problem Solving" Simulation, 2) Managing a Process Layout Simulation, and 3) Inventory Management Simulation.

STEP 1
- What are lessons learned relative to the importance and effectiveness of process control, managing process layouts, and inventory management?

Process Control:

The first lesson is that since the production process involves human and mechanical dimension, there is a need to continually improve and control these. Process control helps us in this process. Second, the lesson learnt is that process control is affected through a variety of tools and principles. For example, quality improvement principles are used in statistical process control. The third lesson learnt is that it is important to select the appropriate tool for the process control. For example, the operations manager should know if he should go in for computer aided operations or hardware variability control. Fourth, the lesson learnt is that it is important for the operations manager to correctly identify the operations and subsystems that need to be controlled. The fifth lesson learnt is that process planning is of utmost importance for process control. For example, processes like raw material retrieval and handling need to be planned, the sequence of operations need to be planned before they are controlled, the timing of operations must be fixed, the type of operations like machining, tooling and fixing need to be planned before these are controlled, and the number of operations need to be decided beforehand.

Managing Process Layouts
The first lesson learnt is that the critical production activities like part manufacturing planning, assembly process planning and resource management are not compromised. The second lesson learnt is that the process layout should give your team and supply chain partners further access to key data when needed. The third lesson learnt is that the process layout should give more efficient collaboration and more informed decision-making. Fourth, the process layout should be such that it should allow rapid response to product design changes. Fifth, the process layout should be such that it should facilitate the sharing of manufacturing and product design best practices.

Inventory Management:

The first lesson learnt is that there is a need for maintaining accurate on-hand quantities matched with excellent warehouse and stockroom organization. The next lesson learnt is that the company should explore the benefits of the different material storage methods and select the method that is most productive for its purposes; in addition, the company should have a contingency plan of what it will do if it runs out of warehouse space. The third lesson learnt is that the manager in charge of inventory should make the full use of bar coding and similar techniques and these should be used to develop an approved stock list for each ...

Solution Summary

This posting gives you an in-depth insight into three simulations of Operations Management.

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3. What is the difference between finite and infinite loading?

4. You are responsible for an operation that has 12 distinct jobs. Seven of those jobs must be processed in two operations. All seven jobs must go through D and E in that sequence, i.e., D first and then E. Determine the optimal order in which the jobs should be sequenced through the process using the following times:

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1 9 6
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5 1 2
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5. A machine shop has two machines, A and B. Four jobs need to be processed through machine A first and B second. Job 1 will take one hour on machine A and three hours on machine B. Job 2 will take three hours on A and two hours on B. Job 3 will take seven on A and three on B. Job 4 will take five hours on A and one hour on B. Using Johnson's rule, in what order should these jobs be done?

6. A work center has five jobs assigned to it. They are labeled, in the order of their arrival in the shop, as jobs A, B, C, D, and E. The work center may work on only one job at a time and must complete any job it starts before starting another job. Job A has a processing time of 6 days and is due to the customer in 9 days. Job B has a processing time of 2 days and is due in 16 days. Job C has a processing time of 4 days and is due in 10 days. Job D has a processing time of 3 days and is due in 7 days. Job E has a processing time of 5 days and is due in 12 days. Using the earliest due date (EDD) priority rule, what will be the average lateness of these orders?

7. What is the role of judgment and evaluation in simulation?

8. Discuss the most common approach to determining the appropriate run length of a simulation.

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