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Can Siebel Stop Its Slide

Problem:
Based upon the - "Can Siebel Stop Its Slide" article, construct a 4 to 5
a. Understand the problem situation

b. Define the problem

Look beyond the obvious; someti Based upon the - "Can Siebel Stop Its Slide" article, construct a 4 to 5
a. Understand the problem situation

b. Define the problem

Look beyond the obvious; sometimes the obvious is merely symptomatic of underlying problems

Because organizations are systems, problems are usually interrelated

Look at external (i.e., competitive environment) as well as internal (i.e., marketing policies) aspects

Because you won't be able to deal with all problems, you will need to be selective and ask yourself:

I. What happens if the problem is not addressed?

ii. How quickly does the problem need to be solved?

iii. To what extent is the problem the cause of other problems?

iv. Can anything be done about the problem?

v. Is the problem worth solving?

Write a problem statement

c. Decide on criteria for a solution

Characteristics of a "good" solution (what would the future look like if the problem was solved?)

Constraints (legal requirements, risk, etc.)

d. Generate alternatives

Brainstorm creative solutions from personal experience

Conduct benchmarking research on competitors and non-competitors

e. Design an implementation/solutions strategy

f. How will success be measured?

g. Present recommendations

Solution Summary

The solution discusses - Problem:
Based upon the - "Can Siebel Stop Its Slide" article, construct a 4 to 5
a. Understand the problem situation

b. Define the problem

Look beyond the obvious; someti Based upon the - "Can Siebel Stop Its Slide" article, construct a 4 to 5
a. Understand the problem situation

b. Define the problem

Look beyond the obvious; sometimes the obvious is merely symptomatic of underlying problems

Because organizations are systems, problems are usually interrelated

Look at external (i.e., competitive environment) as well as internal (i.e., marketing policies) aspects

Because you won't be able to deal with all problems, you will need to be selective and ask yourself:

I. What happens if the problem is not addressed?

ii. How quickly does the problem need to be solved?

iii. To what extent is the problem the cause of other problems?

iv. Can anything be done about the problem?

v. Is the problem worth solving?

Write a problem statement

c. Decide on criteria for a solution

Characteristics of a "good" solution (what would the future look like if the problem was solved?)

Constraints (legal requirements, risk, etc.)

d. Generate alternatives

Brainstorm creative solutions from personal experience

Conduct benchmarking research on competitors and non-competitors

e. Design an implementation/solutions strategy

f. How will success be measured?

g. Present recommendations

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