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    Working with Statistical Terms

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    Statistics Questions

    1. Determine if this is an example of probability or statistics:
    More than half of all men surveyed preferred to watch college football over college basketball.
    2. Determine if this data is qualitative or quantitative:
    Gender
    3. Determine if this study is experimental or observational:
    Tests were conducted on two types of AA batteries to compare the lifetimes of each.
    4. Construct a grouped frequency distribution for the data given below:
    233 219 224 220 226 231 232 226 221 220
    230 232 224 220 223 229 222 226 229 232
    5. Determine if this is an example of a variable or a parameter:
    The average salary of an actuary is $74,270.
    6. Determine if this statistical study is descriptive or inferential:
    A study establishes a link between underage drinking and suicide rate among teens.
    7. Given the class midpoints in the histogram below, create the corresponding grouped frequency distribution:

    8. Identify the sampling technique used to obtain this sample:
    A man who is lost asks the first three people he encounters on a sidewalk for directions.
    9. In your own line of work, give one example of a discrete
    and one example of a continuous random variable, and describe why each is continuous or discrete.

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    I have answered your posting in the attached MS Word doc. Good luck.

    Statistics Questions

    1. Determine if this is an example of probability or statistics:
    More than half of all men surveyed preferred to watch college football over college basketball.
    Here's a good example of the difference between Probability and Statistics: You have a jar with red and green jelly beans in it. A Probability approach to such jar would predict the probability of selecting 2 red and 3 green jelly beans from the jar, if you knew that there were a total of 10 red and 15 green jelly beans in the jar to begin with. A Statistics approach to this jar would ask you to estimate the percentage of red and green jelly beans in the jar (when you do NOT know how many of each there are in the jar), given that you just pulled out 2 red and 3 green jelly beans. In a sense the men who prefer to watch college football over college basketball are the "red jelly beans" and the men who do NOT prefer to watch college football over college basketball are the "green jelly beans". This is an example of statistics.
    2. Determine if this data is qualitative or quantitative:
    Gender
    Qualitative data is also known as categorical data and the values on a qualitative scale are always names, labels or categories (like "Male" and "Female"). Quantitative data is also known as numerical data because the values on a quantitative scale of measurement are numbers that are meaningful as numbers...they actually measure an amount of something (like height and weight, for example). Since the values on a Gender scale are typically just Male and Female, Gender is definitely a ...

    Solution Summary

    The expert examines working with statistical terms. The expert determines if the study is experimental or observational.

    $2.19

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