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Hindu Concept of Karma

Karma is a term most commonly used by both Hindus and Buddhists and is defined as actions that determine the future state of someone. According to the Hindu belief system Karma is founded upon the principles of cause and effect. For example, if an individual spends his or her whole lifetime committing evil acts against mankind in general Hinduism dictates that, that individual will cause a series of negative situations or circumstances to occur on him or her within this lifetime and the next lifetime which is classified as "bad karma." The pendulum however, swings both ways in terms of distributing good deeds throughout the universe. Good deeds distributed will result in a reciprocal occurrence of good deeds. "There are three types of karma: "agent-karma" which is concerned with the present cause and effect, and will influence future lives; "prarabdha-karma" which had already been caused and is in the process of being effected; and, "sanchita-karma" which has been accumulated but has not yet been effected." (Guilley, Shepard, and Woodward, 1971, 1991).

The religion of Hindu believes in reincarnation in which case good or bad deeds will not go unrewarded even after an individual passes away. The purpose of life according to the Hindu faith is to reduce "bad karma" in order to enjoy or have a better life and a better rebirth. "The ultimate spiritual goal is to achieve release (moksha) from the cycle of samsara altogether. It may take hundreds or thousands of rebirths to get rid of all of one's accumulated karma and achieve moksha. The person who has become liberated (attained moksha) creates no more new karma during the present lifetime and is not reborn after death" (Hinnellis, 1997).

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Karma is a term most commonly used by both Hindus and Buddhists and is defined as actions that determine the future state of someone. According to the Hindu belief system Karma is founded upon the principles of cause and effect. For example, if an individual spends his or her whole lifetime committing evil acts against mankind in general Hinduism dictates that, that individual will cause a series of negative situations or circumstances to occur on him or her within this lifetime and the next lifetime which is classified as "bad karma." The pendulum however, swings both ways in terms of distributing good deeds throughout the universe. Good deeds distributed will result in a reciprocal occurrence of good deeds. "There are three types of karma: "agent-karma" which is concerned with the present ...

Solution Summary

Karma is a term most commonly used by both Hindus and Buddhists and is defined as actions that determine the future state of someone. According to the Hindu belief system Karma is founded upon the principles of cause and effect. For example, if an individual spends his or her whole lifetime committing evil acts against mankind in general Hinduism dictates that, that individual will cause a series of negative situations or circumstances to occur on him or her within this lifetime and the next lifetime which is classified as "bad karma." The pendulum however, swings both ways in terms of distributing good deeds throughout the universe. Good deeds distributed will result in a reciprocal occurrence of good deeds. "There are three types of karma: "agent-karma" which is concerned with the present cause and effect, and will influence future lives; "prarabdha-karma" which had already been caused and is in the process of being effected; and, "sanchita-karma" which has been accumulated but has not yet been effected." (Guilley, Shepard, and Woodward, 1971, 1991).

The religion of Hindu believes in reincarnation in which case good or bad deeds will not go unrewarded even after an individual passes away. The purpose of life according to the Hindu faith is to reduce "bad karma" in order to enjoy or have a better life and a better rebirth. "The ultimate spiritual goal is to achieve release (moksha) from the cycle of samsara altogether. It may take hundreds or thousands of rebirths to get rid of all of one's accumulated karma and achieve moksha. The person who has become liberated (attained moksha) creates no more new karma during the present lifetime and is not reborn after death" (Hinnellis, 1997).

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