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Compare the polcies of Elizabeth I and Charles, the I

Queen Elizabeth I acted diplomatically concerning complex religious issues in her country. She did not want to continue the religious turmoil experienced during the time of her predecessors. At the same she wanted to establish Protestantism in England. In order to achieve this aim, she adopted the policy of diplomacy without estranging the Catholics. The Church of England was established by the two acts which were passed during her tenure. They were the Act of Supremacy and the Act of Uniformity. The religious settlement came into force in 1559. Inspite of criticisms, it was a great success.
Charles I believed in the Divine Right of kings. Throughout his tenure, he did not compromise on this issue. He was ruling at time when religious conflict between Protestants and Catholics was at its height. In sharp contrast to Queen Elizabeth I, Charles I appointed William Laud in 1628 as the Bishop of England. William Laud was an ardent opponent of the Roman Catholic Church. Inspite of his opposition to the Roman Catholic Church, he had a Catholic outlook. Puritans charged him that he was trying to re-introduce Catholicism in England. Laud also clashed with Scottish Presbyterians over the e issue of prayer book. Charles acted as religious tolerant, but people had deep suspicion as he had a Catholic wife and an archbishop with Catholic leanings.

Queen Elizabeth was a political genius and took great care to guide the country. Her exemplary leadership qualities are clear when she appointed able men at the right posts. Some of the great people who assisted her were Sir William Cecil and Sir Francis Walsingham. Her shrewd political leadership guided England from poverty to prosperity.

Queen Elizabeth had an excellent relationship with the parliament. The parliament acquired special powers during her period. The parliament was divided into House of Lords and House of Commons. The parliament dealt with financial matters and passed laws. The queen was free to ask their advice and she called the parliament ten times during her reign. As soon Charles I the first ascended the throne in 1625, he clashed with the parliament over the religious issue. He had poor leadership qualities and had tense relationship with the parliament. The parliament was not pleased, when he supported Louis XIII of France, who was fighting against the Huguenots. Parliament had also demanded that George Villiers, the Duke of Buckingham who misled him should be sacked. Charles did not heed to their demands and dissolved the parliament. He tried to survive without the help of Parliament by imposing ship money tax in 1635. He continued to rule without parliament from 1629-1640. Direct confrontation with parliament began with the inception of Long Parliament in 1640. The end result was the English Civil war of 1642-48. The Royalists were defeated by the army led by Oliver Cromwell. Charles I was captured, tried and beheaded in 1649. Thus we can see that the relationship between Charles I and the parliament was tense throughout his period.

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Queen Elizabeth I acted diplomatically concerning complex religious issues in her country. She did not want to continue the religious turmoil experienced during the time of her predecessors. At the same she wanted to establish Protestantism in England. In order to achieve this aim, she adopted the policy of diplomacy without estranging the Catholics. The Church of England was established by the two acts which were passed during her tenure. They were the Act of Supremacy and the Act of Uniformity. The religious settlement came into force in 1559. Inspite of criticisms, it was a great success.
Charles I believed in the Divine Right of kings. Throughout his tenure, he did not compromise on this issue. He was ruling at time when religious conflict ...

Solution Summary

This solution compares the policies and leadership of Elizabeth I and Charles I with regard to religion and relations to the political community

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