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Christ and the New Covenant

From the following readins: Mark, John 14-16; Matthew 1-3, Luke 1-2; Catechism (para 422-511, 571-664); Kreft 129-138,
what do the biblical readings say about who Jesus is? How do the authors come to the conclusions that the author does about who Jesus is? Is this view complete? What is missing? John holds that Christ is important to both creation and redemption. What does this mean? Is this found in other readings?

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Mark, John 14-16; Matthew 1-3, Luke 1-2; Catechism (para 422-511, 571-664); Kreft 129-138
What do the biblical readings say about who Jesus is? How do the authors come to the conclusions that the author does about who Jesus is? Is this view complete? What is missing? John holds that Christ is important to both creation and redemption. What does this mean? Is this found in other readings?

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Without knowing what the Catechism paragraphs are or the Kreft reference, I'll confine my comments to Scripture. You can look up the Catechism references and the Kreft pages and find out what they say yourself. In addition, you haven't given any chapters for the Mark gospel. Therefore, I'll confine comments to John 14-16, Matthew 1-3, and Luke 1-2.

Let's start with Matthew 1-3. First of all, in Matthew 1:1, we find out that Jesus is of the geneology of David and Abraham. First, what relevance does it make that he is the "son of David"? That is a legal term connoting the Messiah. The Hebrew is "ben David." To be the "son of David" was to say that you are the Messiah, the anointed king of the royal house of David. Second, to say that you are "son of Abraham" is to say that you are of the family of Abraham and an heir to the promises. Remember, G-d made the promises to Abraham and to his seed forever.

In Matthew 1:21, we find out that his name is not "Jesus" at all, but rather "Yehoshua." That's the Hebrew form of his name. It literally means what the Greek text says his name means. Iesous doesn't mean't "saviour" at all, but Yehoshua actually does mean, "Yah is saviour." And that's exactly what the Messiah was. He was Yah[weh] (the name of G-d) in the flesh. Consider John 1:14 which states this specifically -- the word was made flesh. And Yahweh himself appeared on earth as a flesh and blood man to redeem mankind, specifically ...

Solution Summary

Jesus' persona is examined.

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