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IQ, EQ & Amygdalic High-jacking

Based on research by Goleman (2005), many people with an high IQ (cognitive intelligence) and low EQ (emotional intelligence) do poorly in work and other relationships. In fact, Golemen describes a fellow student with five perfect SAT scores but the fellow student lacked EQ, and failed to live up to his potentials. Also in one of his chapter's, Goleman describes Gary, a man without feelings but yet he is brilliant in the fields of science and art.

1. Describe the differences between cognitive traditional intelligence (IQ) and emotional intelligence (EQ). Examine the neurophysiology and behavioral outcomes of an "amygdalic high-jacking".

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Hi,

Let's take a closer look at the two types of IQ first through a brief historical overview and then compare one to the other. Next, we will example the neurophysiology and behavioral outcomes of an "amygdalic high-jacking".

RESPONSE:

1. Describe the differences between cognitive traditional intelligence (IQ) and emotional intelligence (EQ).

Traditional Intelligence (IQ)

The traditional IQ was developed by Alfred Binet and Theodora Simon when they developed the Binet Simon Test (1905) designed to measure the intelligence of retarded children, based upon their observations that (1) just as children grow taller as they grow older, they grow more mentally capable as they grow older; and (2) some children can perform at age and equivalent-grade levels above their chronological ages, while other children perform at age and equivalent-grade levels below their chronological ages. It wasn't until 1911 that the concept of "mental age" (as distinguished from "chronological age") was introduced. The 6-year-old who performed as well as the average 8-year-old was assigned a mental age of 8. William Stern (1912) then noticed that even though the gap between mental age and chronological age widens as a child matures, the ratio of mental age to chronological age remains constant (and, as we will see, remains essentially constant throughout life). This constant ratio of mental age divided by chronological age was given the name "Intelligence Quotient". Actually, the intelligence quotient is defined as 100 times the Mental Age (MA) divided by the Chronological Age (CA); thus, the equation: IQ = 100 MA/CA (http://www.geocities.com/rnseitz/Definition_of_IQ.html).

Emotional Intelligence (EQ)

While the traditional IQ focused only on cognitive ability and skills, Goleman argued that cognitive ability seemed to play a rather limited role in accounting for why some people are more successful than others and that emotional and social factors play a larger part in IQ than is recognized by the traditional IQ measures. This is significant, because the traditional IQ measure makes the claim that you will never be as successful if you have a lower IQ, whereas Goleman argued that you can still ...

Solution Summary

This solution describes the differences between cognitive traditional intelligence (IQ) and emotional intelligence (EQ). It also examines the neurophysiology and behavioral outcomes of an "amygdalic high-jacking".

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