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The current in a diode is given as a function of voltage

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Q- The current I as a function of voltage V for a certain diode is given by

I(V)=I_0 (e^(eV/kT) - 1)

Here k is Boltzmann's constant, e is the charge on an electron (magnitude), and T is the absolute temperature. Let at room temperature (t = 20 degree C), I_0 = 1.5 × 10^(-9)A.
(A) What is the resistance of the diode for V = 0.51 V?
(B) What is the resistance of the diode for V = 0.61 V?

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Q- The current as a function of V for a certain diode is given by

I(V)=I_0 (e^(eV/kT)-1)

Here k is Boltzmann's constant, e is the charge on an electron (magnitude), and T is the absolute temperature. Let at room temperature (t = 20 oC), I0 = 1.5 × 10 -9A.
What is the resistance of the diode for V = 0.51V?
What is the resistance of the diode for V = 0.61V?

Solution:

The current is not directly proportional to the potential difference and thus the conductor is not following Ohm's law and thus called a non-Ohmic conductor.

According to Ohm's law if the physical conditions of a conductor remain ...

Solution Summary

The law according to which the resistance of a diode varies with voltage is given. Its resistance is calculated for two different voltages.

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