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    Descartes argument for the existence of the "I"

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    In Mediation II, Descartes states that "thus after everything has been most carefully weighed, it must be established that this pronouncement " I am, I exist is necessarily true every time I utter it or conceive it in my mind". The problem is, how is knowledge of the existence of the self possible even when the possibility of a deceiving-god cannot be dismissed?

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    In Mediation II, Descartes states that "thus after everything has been most carefully weighed, it must be established that this pronouncement " I am, I exist is necessarily true every time I utter it or conceive it in my mind". How is knowledge of the existence of the self is possible even when the possibility of a deceiving-god cannot be dismissed?

    The question relates to Descartes Meditations, in particular, Meditation II "Concerning the Nature of the Human Mind: That it is better known than the body". In this Meditation, Descartes explores the notion of thinking in relation to existence. He starts out by reminding himself that he cannot be certain of anything, not the objects around him and not his own body nor his senses. Yet he ends up with the conclusion, that despite doubting everything, and despite that he might be deceived into thinking that he ...

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    This solution offers a brief overview of Descartes argument for knowledge of the self, even in the event that a deceiving-God should exist.

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