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Title VII and Workplace Discrimination

Need help with project: please discuss the following issues at it relates to Title VII (workplace discrimination).

1. The history and evolution of Title VII and its amendments (PDA, ADA, ADEA)
2. Who is covered and not covered under Title VII and its amendments.
3. Policies that companies should have in place to avoid violations of Title VII and its amendments.
4. How the law defines sexual harassment and employers' responsibilities for addressing employees' complaints in the work place.

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Hello,

Interesting questions! Let's take a closer look at each of the four sections. I will write in in plain language, but I will also include the references for you to refer to as well. I also attached a couple of extra resources.

RESPONSE:

Question: Need help with project: please discuss the following issues at it relates to Title VII (workplace discrimination).

1. The history and evolution of Title VII and its amendments (PDA, ADA, ADEA).

Title VII is one section of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of race, sex, color, religion, or national origin. However, for each of these discriminations, cases are tried on an individual bases. Since then, however, Title VII has evolved and been amended to include other populations of people to be protected from discrimination under Title VII (e.g., PDA, ADA and ADEA). It is up to the employer to uphold Title VII regulations and amendments that are enforced by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 originally prohibits discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin. In other words, it is unlawful to discriminate against any individual in regard to work related action, including recruiting, hiring and promotion, transfer, work assignments, performance measurements, the work environment, job training, discipline and discharge, wages and benefits, or any other term, condition, or privilege of employment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin. Language is also regulated by EEOC, such as racial slurs, sexual slurs or connotations, crude language, etc. e.g., hostile work environment. Likewise, religious discrimination is regulated through EEOC regulations that require an employer to reasonably accommodate the religious belief of an employee or prospective employee, unless doing so would impose an undue hardship. <http://www.eeoc.gov/types/race.html>

Since its inscription in 1964, however, there have been several amendments to Title VII to protect other populations (e.g. employees 40 years of age or older, people with disabilities, and women who are pregnant). For example, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) protects individuals who are 40 years of age or older from employment discrimination based on age, protecting both employees and job applicants. Under the ADEA, for example, it is unlawful to discriminate against a person because of their age with respect to any term, condition, or privilege of employment ? including, but not limited to, hiring, firing, promotion, layoff, compensation, ...

Solution Summary

This solution discusses various issues as they relates to Title VII (workplace discrimination) e.g. the history and evolution of Title VII and its amendments; who is covered and not covered under Title VII and its amendments; policies that companies should have in place to avoid violations of Title VII and its amendments and how the law defines sexual harassment and employers' responsibilities for addressing employees' complaints in the work place. Supplemented with a highly informative article on the ADA, as well as an example of a Sexual Harassment Policy.

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