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The historical ruling of John Marshall

In the McCulloch v. Maryland case of 1819, the Supreme Court judge John Marshall gave a landmark judgment which had far reaching effects on the history of United States. The court ruled that it was true that the congress had no particular power to create a bank, but it had implied or enumerated powers other than the powers listed in the constitution. The Article I of the constitution empowers the congress to carry out other functions which were responsible. These were delegated powers given to the congress by the constitution. The bank was needed to stabilize the fluctuating economy of the country. The court also pointed the principle of the supremacy of the national government over the states. The states had no power to tax the institution of Federal government.
The verdict empowered the congress to use the implied powers leading to the expansion of the role of the federal government. The congress has now the power to undertake actions which are not listed in the constitution, if the means served the constitutional end. In the years following, the national supremacy was challenged especially during time of the Civil War in 1860s, but it withstood the test of time.

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In the McCulloch v. Maryland case of 1819, the Supreme Court judge John Marshall gave the judgment which had far reaching effects on the history of United States. The court ruled that it was true that the congress had no particular power to create a bank, but it had implied or enumerated ...

Solution Summary

This solution explains about the historical ruling of John Marshall and how it applies to the case of McCulloch v. Maryland. The verdict empowered the congress to expand the role of the Federal government using Article I of the constitution.

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