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How the Constitution endangered freedom

Why did some Founding Fathers think that the Constitution might endanger freedom?
What is the response of those who favoured the Constitution - how did they think it would protect freedom or improve on the Articles of Confederation?

Provide APA citations to support your statements.

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Why did some Founding Fathers think that the Constitution might endanger freedom?
What is the response of those who favored the Constitution - how did they think it would protect freedom or improve on the Articles of Confederation?

The founders were not a unified group. At the very least, they were divided into two factions, those who sought more power for the central federal state, and the others, who sought a more dispersed form of power devolved to states and localities. Historically, they are called, respectively, the Federalists and Anti-Federalists. The two groups wrote substantial polemics against each other. The addition of the Bill of Rights mollified most, but not all, of the Anti-Federalist movement. As it turns out, on nearly every prediction, the Anti-Federalists were correct.

One of the best known leaders of the Anti-Federalist party was Patrick Henry. He was opposed to the Constitution on several grounds: first, that a standing army is an invitation to tyranny, the President had too much power, several clauses were to gaping to be unexploited by the federal state, that the judiciary had too much power, and, more generally, that the power given to the capital was simply too great for a piece of paper to guarantee. In a ferocious debate with James Madison in 1788, Henry stated, speaking on the question of a standing army:

But, says the honorable member, Congress will keep the militia armed; or, in other words, they will do their duty. Pardon me if I am too jealous and suspicious to confide in this remote possibility. My honorable friend went on a supposition that the American rulers, like all others, will depart from their duty without bars and checks. No government can be safe without checks. Then he told us they had no temptation to violate their duty, and that it would be their interest to perform it. Does he think you are to trust men who cannot have separate interests from the people? It is a novelty in the political world (as great a novelty as the system itself) to find rulers without private interests, and views of personal emoluments, and ambition. . .
My honorable friend attacked the honorable gentleman with universal principles — that, in all nations and ages, rulers have been actuated by motives of individual interest and private emoluments, and that in America it would be so also. I hope, before we part with this great bulwark, this noble palladium of safety, we shall have such checks interposed as will render us secure. The militia, sir, is our ultimate safety. . .

Of course, he is referring to the popular militia, made up of states and localities, not any standing army. The whole point, generally speaking, is that the sheer amount of power that is granted to the federal apparatus and that soon will be taken by them, is too much for a normal man to resist.

Oncerning the federal judiciary, he states further:

I consider the Virginia judiciary as one of the best barriers against strides of power — against that power which, we are told by the honorable gentleman, has threatened the destruction of liberty. Pardon me for expressing my extreme regret that it is in their power to take away that barrier. Gentlemen will not say that any danger can be expected from the state legislatures. So small are the barriers against the encroachments and usurpations of Congress, that, when I see this last barrier — the independency of the judges — impaired, I am persuaded I see the prostration of all our rights. In what a situation will your judges be, when they are sworn to preserve the Constitution of the state and of the general government! If ...

Solution Summary

The expert determines how constitution is endangered freedom. The response for favored constitution are provided.

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