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Warren Court Importance

The Supreme Court shifted away from its focus on property rights to personal rights when Chief Justice Earl Warren took over the court in 1953. Prior to the Warren Court, a majority of the cases centered around building a foundation for property law. That all changed with the Warren court's first landmark caseâ?"Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, which opened the battle for school desegregation. After working hard to get a unanimous ruling in that case, Warren continued to work his magic to lead the court in a series of cases that guaranteed numerous personal rights, which primarily focused on the Bill of Rights.

The critical cases mentioned above helped make the Warren Court the second most extraordinary court in U.S. historyâ?"second only to the Marshall Court.

Review the following website (http://www.infoplease.com/cig/supreme-court/warren-court.html) and read through the various links regarding Earl Warren and the Warren Court. Outline the four key cases - Brown v. Board of Education, Gideon v. Wainwright, Miranda v. Arizona, and Tinker v. Des Moines School District, and create a thorough summary of each of these cases, including: the initial problem(s), the individuals affected, the individuals involved, and when the case took place.

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Hello and welcome to Brain Mass today.

Review the following website and read through the various links regarding Earl Warren and the Warren Court. Once you have done this, you will need to outline the four key cases - Brown v. Board of Education, Gideon v. Wainwright, Miranda v. Arizona, and Tinker v. Des Moines School District. You will use the attached document to create a thorough summary of each of these cases. All summaries should be in paragraph form and discuss important facts regarding each case including: the initial problem(s), the individuals affected, the individuals involved, and when the case took place.

Here are important facts that you need for your summaries.

Brown vs. the Board of Education
In the 1950's, "separate but equal" laws were predominant across the country especially in the South. Although blacks and whites were given separate but equal facilities such as schools, equal was a loosely interoperated term and in many cases such as in schools, it simply meant that blacks were given a school building. The quality of the education was far from equal compared to white schools.

During this time in Topeka, Kansas, a black third-grader named Linda Brown had to walk a dangerous and far way to her black elementary school even though one was much closer but was for whites. When Linda's father tried to enroll her in this school and was turned away, he "...went to McKinley Burnett, the head of Topeka's branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and asked for help" (Cozzens 1995). The NAACP was very eager help the Browns and to tackle the issue of racial discrimination in the schools. Soon other parents joined in the fight and the case went to court at the US District Court from June 25-26, 1951. The NAACP argued that segregated schools made black children inferior to whites therefore they were not equal at all. The Board of Education argued that because segregation was everywhere, they were preparing black children for the segregation ...

Solution Summary

This solution discusses the Warren Court.

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