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I am trying to grasp the theory of market concentration and its surrounding theories.

1. Industry structure is often measured by computing the Four-Firm Concentration Ratio. Suppose you have an industry with 20 firms and the CR is 30%. How would you describe this industry? Suppose the demand for the product rises and pushes up the price for the good. What long-run adjustments would you expect following this change in demand? What does your adjustment process imply about the CR for the industry?
2.Now assuming the industry has 20 firms but the CR for the industry is 80% instead of 30%. How would you describe this industry? What are some reasons why this industry has a high CR while the other industry had a low CR? Is it possible for smaller firms to thrive and profit in such an industry? How? Contrast the effects on market efficiency if the dominating firms use a price leadership model versus a contestable markets model.

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In economics, the concentration ratio of an industry is used as an indicator of the relative size of firms in relation to the industry as a whole. This may also assist in determining the market form of the industry. One commonly used concentration ratio is the four-firm concentration ratio, which consists of the market share, as a percentage, of the four largest firms in the industry. In general, the N-firm concentration ratio is the percentage of market output generated by the N largest firms in the industry.
Market forms can often be classified by their concentration ratio. Listed, in ascending firm size, they are:
• Perfect competition, with a very low concentration ratio,
• Monopolistic competition, below 40 ...

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