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Determining Source/Destination Addresses

See the attached file.
This is a two-part question:

Part 1:

Accessing a computer in your own subnet. You are using the Microsoft Internet Explorer web browser on the CLIENT computer located in building 'A' to look at a web page on the web server located in building A
(www1.anyorg.com). Assume that your system already knows the IP address and Ethernet address of the web server www1.anyorg.com (so you do not have to do a DNS lookup or ARP request). Fill in the missing information that would be contained in the Ethernet frame as it leaves your computer: (See attachment). Please explain how you come to this conclusion when filling in the blanks?

Part 2:

Accessing a computer in a different subnet. Once again you are using the Microsoft Internet Explorer web browser on the CLIENT computer located in building 'A' to look at a web page on the web server located in building B (www2.anyorg.com). Assume that your system already knows the IP address of the web server www2.anyorg.com (so you do not have to do a DNS lookup). Fill in the missing information that would be contained in the Ethernet frame as it leaves your computer. (see attachment). Again, please explain how you determined the answers.

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Attachments

Solution Preview

Please see the attached file.

PART A

Address Type Source Address Destination Address
Port Address Ephemerial - Port 1076 Port: 80
IP Address 128.192.98.130 128.192.98.53
Ethernet (MAC) Address 00-0C-00-33-3A-A3 00-0C-00-33-3A-F2

As the sender knows the IP address and MAC address of the web-server ...

Solution Summary

Determining source/destination addresses is achieved and discussed in the solution.

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