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Object-Relational Mapping (ORM): Hibernate

This Application challenges you to evaluate connectivity issues between database management systems (DBMS) and procedural programming languages.

Ever since relational databases (RDBMS) became popular in the early 1980s, programmers have encountered a major disconnect between their code and the RDBMS. Although a query to the RDBMS may return many thousands of records at one time, traditional procedural programming languages, such as COBOL, C, and Basic operate on records one at a time. The RDBMS can return an arbitrary number of columns (or fields) that contain almost any kind of data; most of the procedural languages expect a fixed type and number of data fields. The ODBC and JDBC attempt to bridge these gaps. Furthermore, object-oriented programming languages, like C++ and Java, have even more issues because an RDBMS cannot store objects directly.

ORM, as provided in frameworks like Hibernate, is an attempt to bridge these gaps. In a 4- to 5-page paper discuss the benefits and drawbacks of using Hibernate as an object-relational mapping (ORM) library with Java. Consider issues such as complexity of the application code with and without Hibernate. Explain in what ways you would consider changing the Hibernate framework.

Solution Summary

This solution explains the benefits and drawbacks of using Hibernate as an object-relational mapping (ORM) library with Java. Issues such as complexity of the application code with and without Hibernate are considered. Also the ways in which one could consider changing the Hibernate framework are explored.

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