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    Detecting Ultraviolet, Visible and Infrared Light

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    Would you use the same detector in detecting ultraviolet, visible and infrared light? Why or why not? Explain.

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com October 3, 2022, 1:33 am ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/chemistry/experimental-design-and-methods-in-chemistry/detecting-ultraviolet-visible-infrared-light-97710

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    The answer is no because each of these lights possess different properties that any one detector may not be able to detect this whole range.

    Take visible light for example, the simplest detector is our eyes. This is why this light is called visible. Using our eyes we cannot detect UV and infrared (IR).

    Ultraviolet detectors generally use either a solid-state device, such as one based on silicon carbide or aluminum nitride, or a gas-filled tube as the sensing element. UV detectors which are sensitive to UV light in any part of the spectrum respond to irradiation by sunlight and artificial light.

    An infrared detector is a photodetector that reacts to infrared (IR) radiation. Most types of IR detectors give an electrical signal as output.

    Reference:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Electromagnetic_spectrum.JPG

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com October 3, 2022, 1:33 am ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/chemistry/experimental-design-and-methods-in-chemistry/detecting-ultraviolet-visible-infrared-light-97710

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