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Do you think the federal government should have similar legislation imposed on its various departments that exceed a given threshold of expenditure on an annual basis?

Do you think the federal government should have similar legislation imposed on its various departments that exceed a given threshold of expenditure on an annual basis? Or stated another way, are there elements of this legislation that are relevant and should be imposed upon government spending (including Congress)?

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Do you think the federal government should have similar legislation imposed on its various departments that exceed a given threshold of expenditure on an annual basis? Or stated another way, are there elements of this legislation that are relevant and should be imposed upon government spending (including Congress)?
Yes I think that the federal government should have a similar legislation imposed on its various departments that exceed a given threshold of expenditure on an annual basis. This is because there is fraud in the government departments. Consider this example, The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), a part of the Department of the Interior, has stolen billions of dollars from various Indian tribes. This is not an exaggeration. Nor is it an untruth, as you will see. The federal government has done nothing about this. Rather, they have ignored it, implicitly stating that it's okay to steal from America's Natives. By doing nothing, the government condones theft from American Indians. Certainly, this is neither a responsible stance nor one that promotes racial equality. According their mission statement, the BIA is "to promote economic opportunity" for the people they serve -- the American Indians. Such is not the case. Instead, with overt lack of respect and BIA's Bill Benjamin's sentiment that "it's just Indian money... it doesn't matter", the BIA is indicative of the government's own racist attitudes against Native peoples. In its 11/28/94 issue, U.S. News & World Report described the BIA as "the worst federal agency." Little was done.
A recent Business Wire story reported, "57 percent of government employees say they've seen ethical violations." David L. Henry would agree -- and go several steps further, further illuminating the corruption and massive fraud within the BIA. Henry, a non-Indian and CPA, began his career as an accountant working for Arthur Andersen & Co. He later worked as controller for a group of construction companies , Volkswagen, and Reader's Digest. Clearly, he knows finances. In 1985, he joined the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Billings, Montana. Ten months later, he was fired for "insubordination" because, as he says:
I found fraud in every one of the several BIA financial systems I examined, and what can only be seen as ...

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