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Case study on compensation options

Based on the case study below, I am looking for a case study (3 page minimum) that not only answers the three questions below, but also loosely follows this outline:

•Identify both the key issues and the underlying issues. In identifying the issues, you should be able to connect them to the HR principles which apply to this situation.
•Discuss the facts which affect these issues. The case may have too much information. In your discussion, you should filter the information and discuss those facts which are pertinent to the issues identified above.
•Discuss your tentative solution to the problem and how you would implement your solution. What actions would you propose to correct the situation, based on the knowledge you have gained in this course?
•Discuss follow-up and contingency plans. How will the organization know that your proposed solution is working? What should they do if it does not work?

Within the case study - be sure to answer the following:

Arlan is seeking input from you on how to proceed. Specifically, he want you to:
1) Recommend whether Jane should receive a best-shot, competitive, or low ball offer and why.
2) Recommend other inducements beyond salary, health insurance, vacation, and schedule that might be addressed in the job offer, and why?
3) Draft a proposed job offer letter to Jane, incorporating your recommendations from items 1 and 2 above, as well as other desired features that should be part of the job offer letter.

CASE STUDY
Clean Car Care (3Cs) is located within a western city of 175,000 people. The company owns and operates four full-service car washes in the city. The owner of 3Cs, Arlan Autospritz, has strategically cornered the car wash market, with his only competition being two coin-operated car washes on the outskirts of the city. The unemployment rate in the city and surrounding area is 3.8%, and it is expected to go somewhat lower.

Arlan has staffed 3Cs by hiring locally and paying wage premiums (above market wages) to induce people to accept job offers and to remain with 3Cs. Hiring occurs at the entry level only, for the job of car washer. If they remain with 3Cs, washers have the opportunity to progress through the ranks, going from car washer to shift lead person to assistant manager to manager of one of the four car wash facilities. Until recently, this staffing system worked well for Arlan. He was able to hire high-quality people, and a combination of continued wage premiums and promotion opportunities meant he had relatively little turnover (under 30% annually). Every manager at 3Cs, past or present, had come up through the ranks. But that is now changing with the sustained low unemployment and the new hires, who just naturally seem more turnover prone. The internal promotion pipeline is thus drying up, since few new hires are staying with 3Cs long enough to begin climbing up the ladder.
Arlan has a vacancy for the job of manager at the north-side facility. Unfortunately, he does not think any of his assistant managers are qualified for the job, and has reluctantly concluded that he has to fill the job externally.
A vigorous three-county recruitment campaign netted Arlan a total of five applicants. Initial assessments resulted in four of those being candidates, and two candidates became finalists. Jane Roberts is the number-one finalist, and the one to whom Arlan has decided to extend the offer. Jane is excited about the job and told Arlan that she will accept an offer if the terms are right. Arlan is quite certain Jane will get a counteroffer from her company. Jane has excellent supervisory experience in fast-food stores and a light manufacturing plant. She is willing to relocate, a move of about 45 miles. She will not be able to start for 45 days, due to preparing for the move and the need to give adequate notice to her present employer. As a single parent, Jane wants to avoid work on either Saturday of Sunday each week. The number-two finalist is Betts Cook. Though she lacks the supervisory experience that Jane has, Arlan views her as superior to Jane in customer service skills. Jane told Arlan she needs to know quickly if she is going to get the offer, since she is in line for a promotion at her current company and she wants to begin at 3Cs before being offered and accepting the promotion.
Arlan is mulling over what kind of offer to make Jane. His three managers make between $28,000 --$35,000, with annual raises based on a merit review conducted by Arlan. The managers receive one week of vacation the first year, two weeks of vacation for the next four years, and three weeks of vacation after that. They also receive health insurance (with a 20% employee co-pay on the premium.)The managers work 5 days each, with work on both Saturday and Sunday frequently during peak times. Jane currently makes $31,500, receives health insurance with no employee co-pay and has one week of vacation (she is due to receive two weeks shortly). She works Monday to Friday, with occasional work on the weekends. Betts earns $34,500, receives fully-paid health insurance and has one week of vacation (will be eligible for 2 weeks in one year). Weekend work - if not constant - is acceptable to her.

Solution Preview

Clean Car Care (3C's) is trying to meet new challenges through its first venture into hiring externally. While previously, the company has been able to meet promotion needs internally, circumstances and quality of workers has made it necessary to seek a manager from outside the company. The finalists are both women and one has children that means working a little more closely with her schedule. Both have qualifications, but one is stronger in management and the other stronger in customer service. Either would work well, but the company prefers to offer the job to the person with management skills if possible. Jane is Arlan the owner's, first choice; Betts is the second.

Jane can start in forty five days, needing time to move and give notice to her current employer. She will also probably get a counter offer from her current job, since she is in line for a promotion. She does not want to have to choose between an offer at 3C's and a promotion at her current company. The job offer would be at more than she currently makes in wages, but the insurance benefit would be different, with her current benefit of one hundred percent company paid premiums and the 3C's offering insurance with a twenty percent co-pay. A higher wage offer may actually be negated with the co-pay. The vacation is better with 3C's, but the scheduling is another problem. There will have to be another concession by 3C's for one day of the weekend off per week, at least most of the time.

3C's should extend the offer with a bit more wages than ...

Solution Summary

A basic review of possible offers for a manager's position as based on case scenario. Additionally a basic letter of a job offer with compensation included.

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