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Decision tree for test procedures and computing EVSIs

Mark Harris, Production Manager of Medical Electronics Inc. is preparing for the delivery of one of his company's new blood analyzers to the Hershey Medical Center. All that remains is to subject the unit to a test procedure to determine whether it meets its design specifications. They will earn a profit of $3100 if the analyzer meets its specifications. If testing reveals a failure to meet specs the equipment will be completely reworked before delivery thereby guaranteeing that the analyzer will be satisfactory. In the event that rework is done, the profit will be only $1600. Should it happen that the analyzer passes the test, is delivered to Hershey and then is found to be unsatisfactory rework costs and a heavy penalty clause in the sales contract will force Medical electronics to take a $900 loss on the deal. Harris will always act in accordance with the test result-deliver if the unit passes the test and rework if it fails.

Harris must choose which of two test procedures to use. If the unit actually meets specification test 1 will indicate it to be satisfactory 80% of the time while test 2 will give a satisfactory result 60% of the time. When the unit fails to meet specifications test 1 will indicate satisfactory 30% of the time while for test 2 the figure is 10%.
Given that Harris assesses the prior probability that the unit meets specifications as 60%, draw a separate decision tree incorporating each of the two tests and compute the EVSI for each.

Solution Summary

The decision tree for test procedures and computing EVSIs is examined.

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