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Stopping a process for strategic management, and goals.

From this statement, The role sequence execution plays is to know where change should begin, how does the sequence affect success, and if there were reasonable stopping points, it triggered a question. What kind of signs do you think companies should follow (or when) in terms of stopping a process for strategic management (attempting to achieve a goal/mission/vision)? Also, is it okay for a company to fall short of it's goal?

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We can find many instances of similar situations, and this is really where sustainability plays a key role. Many companies, and particularly large companies have sustainability programs in place that involve production. Dow has a goal of increasing sales by 10% by the year 2015 strictly for products that are "advantaged by sustainable chemistry" (Dow, 2012). In addition, almost every public company and many private companies have goals that are not production based but where the results are just as positive. Many superstores have goals of reducing waste to zero (Walmart, for example). If Walmart doesn't achieve this goal, their attempts at reducing waste still continue to have an impact on the environment and on their sustainability. Falling short of a goal doesn't give less merit to the goal, but when we do fall short of a goal, it is definitely an indicator to management that a detailed assessment is ...

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This solution addresses the following:

From this statement, The role sequence execution plays is to know where change should begin, how does the sequence affect success, and if there were reasonable stopping points, it triggered a question. What kind of signs do you think companies should follow (or when) in terms of stopping a process for strategic management (attempting to achieve a goal/mission/vision)? Also, is it okay for a company to fall short of it's goal?

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