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Academic writing and business writing

Consider a research paper you have written for a past course. Describe the process by which you performed academic research and wrote academic papers in the past. If you could do that research paper over, how might you change your research process?

Describe and discuss the differences between a thesis statement, a topic sentence, an explanation, an illustration, and an example. When and how must you use all of these in effective academic writing? What parallels, or lack of parallels, do you see between effective academic and business writing?

Solution Preview

Consider a research paper you have written for a past course. Describe the process by which you performed academic research and wrote academic papers in the past. If you could do that research paper over, how might you change your research process?

For many papers I have decided a topic and just started to write on it, with minimal research and finding support at the end of the paper. I have approached them from the point of view of something I wanted to know more about and just wrote from the same perspective. I did not have a clear idea of where I was going or what I really wanted to say.

Now I approach any essay or paper with a different eye. I have a question or more than one question that I want answered. So I write it down. I create an outline of what I may find or how I want to organize the paper. I often think the outline is the most overlooked part of a paper. It only takes a few minutes, but it gives the writer the opportunity to explore areas they want to cover. Using an outline also means you can change direction just by adjusting the outline you are following. If I want to know why the war in Afghanistan has ...

Solution Summary

A discussion on how to make a research paper better and how to apply the different parts to it to make it more effective. A comparison of the differences in academic and business writing.

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