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    How does Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) define merchant

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    How does the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) define a good? How does the UCC define a merchant? How are the UCC requirements different for a merchant versus a nonmerchant? Give examples.

    This solution will break down several important parts of the Uniform Commercial Code and how it defines a merchant versus a nonmerchant. This solution also provides multiple examples.

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    https://brainmass.com/business/business-law/how-does-uniform-commercial-code-ucc-define-merchant-281321

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    1) The Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) defines a good as tangible things that are movable at the time of their identification to the contract [UCC 2-105(1)]. Specially manufactured goods and the unborn young of animals are examples of goods. Certain items are not considered goods and are not subject to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). They include: (1) Money and intangible items, such as stocks, bonds, and patents, are not tangible goods. (2) Real estate is not a tangible good because it is not movable [UCC 2-105(1)]. Minerals, structures, growing crops, and other things that are severable from real estate may be classified as goods subject to Article 2, however. For example, the sale and removal of a ...

    Solution Summary

    The Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) defines a good as tangible things that are movable at the time of their identification to the contract [UCC 2-105(1)]. Specially manufactured goods and the unborn young of animals are examples of goods. Certain items are not considered goods and are not subject to Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC).

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