Share
Explore BrainMass

Heights of winners and runners-up

Assume that the paired sample data are simple random samples and that the differences have a distribution that is approximately normal.

Heights of Winners and Runners-up
Listed below are the heights (in inches) of candidates who won presidential elections and the heights of the candidates who were runners up. The data are in chronological order, so the corresponding heights from the two lists are matched. For candidates who won more than once, only the heights from the first election are included, and no elections before 1900 are included.

a.) A well-known theory is that winning candidates tend to be taller than the corresponding losing candidates. Use a 0.05 significance level to test that theory. Does height appear to be an important factor in winning the presidency?

b.) If you plan to test the claim in part (a) by using a confidence interval, what confidence level should be used? Construct a confidence interval using that confidence level, then interpret the result.

Won Presidency; - 71, 74.5, 74, 73, 69.5, 71.5, 75, 72, 70.5, 69, 74, 70, 71, 72, 70, 67
Runner-up; - 73, 74, 68, 69.5, 72, 71, 72, 71.5, 70, 68, 71, 72, 70, 72, 72, 72.

Solution Preview

See the attached file.

Assume that the paired sample data are simple random samples and that the difference have a distribution that is approximately normal.

Heights of Winners and Runners-up
Listed below are the heights (in inches) of candidates who won presidential elections and the heights of the candidates who were runners up. The data are in chronological order, so the corresponding heights from the two lists are matched. For candidates who won more than once, only the heights from the first election are included, and no elections before 1900 are included.

a.) A well-known theory is that winning candidates tend to be taller ...

Solution Summary

The solution discusses the heights of winners and runners-up.

$2.19