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Children's Sense of Self

As children become more competent in their language skills, they interact more often with peers to learn and to socialize. When children struggle with speech or have reading problems, they often also struggle with making friends. Using the theories from our reading and any other peer-reviewed resource, respond to the following questions.

One of the tasks of middle childhood is in developing age-appropriate skills (e.g., academic and social) that help children to feel confident in their overall abilities. Using Erikson's theory of psychosocial theory in your explanation, describe how children's sense of self develops from both social interactions with peers and adults.

What are some interventions that can be used to help children who feel inferior to their peers gain more confidence? How does learned helplessness increase feelings of inferiority?

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The good news is that Erikson's approach is fairly easy to grasp, so extrapolating what I have below to specific situations will not be a problem.

To answer the questions, we need to take a child's development into its major stages (up until age 18). From that, using class readings (etc) should not be an issue.

The first stage is the youngest years, during infancy.

Interaction here is essential, since what is being built is trust (or the building blocks of it). If care is spotty or even abusive, distrust will result, and a sense of inferiority may develop later on. Support from adults is essential here - peers much less so.
The concept of self here is the existence of predictable and nurturing relationships with parents. This is where learned helplessness can develop rapidly. (Care is the main intervention)

The second is from 2-3 years.

Basic sense of autonomy is developing. Constant failures or mockery from ...

Solution Summary

Children's sense of self are examined. The interventions that can be used to help children who feel inferior to their peers gain more confidence are determined.